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Pensions at a Glance 2007

Public Policies across OECD Countries

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Government-mandated pension and retirement policies have changed dramatically during the past decade. Pensions at a Glance presents a consistent framework for comparing public-pension policies across OECD countries, as well as reliable data. The reportthusprovides the basis for not only evaluating existing pension systems, but also designing and implementing future reforms. This second edition updates in-depth information on the key features of mandatory pension systems—both public and private--in the 30 OECD countries, including projections of retirement income for today’s workers. Two new and important sections have been added to this edition:  (1) Description and analysis of pension reform in OECD countries during the past decade; and (2) a closer look at the complex range of private, voluntary retirement plans now playing a greater role in pension-provision in many OECD countries. This edition includes StatLinks, URLs under each statistical table and graph linking to Excel ® spreadsheets containing the underlying data.

About the first edition of Pensions at a Glance:

"Pensions at a Glance deserves much more than a glance.  It is a compendium of facts and analyses that should inform policy-making and public debate around the world for years to come.  By providing in clear and easy-to-understand form a wealth of information about pension systems throughout the OECD, it will make it much harder for even the most insular to ignore the valuable lessons to be learned from the pension experience of other nations."-- Henry J. Aaron, The Brookings Institution

Named one of 12 international "notable government documents" by the American Library Association.

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Comparing Pension Policies of OECD Countries

This part starts with an overview of the different schemes that together make up national retirement-income systems. A summary of the key features of pension systems – the parameters and rules – follows. The main empirical results, consisting of eight indicators that are calculated using the OECD pension models, are then presented. The first two indicators are both replacement rates; that is, the ratio of pension benefits to individual earnings. These are given in gross and net terms, taking account of taxes and contributions paid on earnings and on retirement incomes. There are also two sensitivity analyses of the gross replacement rate: gross pension replacement rates with entry at age 25; and gross pension replacement rates with different rates of return.

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