Slovenia

Slovenia seeks to eradicate poverty, reduce inequality and achieve sustainable development. The majority of Slovenia’s official development assistance (ODA) is delivered multilaterally, notably through European Union (EU) institutions and this is overseen by the Ministry of Finance. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) is the national co-ordinator for development co-operation and oversees bilateral ODA, which focuses on Slovenia’s near neighbourhood in the Western Balkans and Eastern Europe.

The first OECD-DAC peer review of Slovenia in 2017 recognised the government’s effort to build its development co-operation system. It suggested that Slovenia outline its approach to poverty eradication, particularly in middle-income countries in its immediate neighbourhood; adopt a smaller geographic footprint which maximises Slovenia’s comparative advantage; adapt its framework programme to achieve a comprehensive and coherent whole-of-government approach to ODA; and ensure all stakeholders delivering ODA understand the importance of mainstreaming gender equality. An OECD-DAC mid-term review of Slovenia is due to take place in 2020. Learn more about the 2017 OECD-DAC peer review of Slovenia.

Slovenia’s legal framework comprises the International Development Co-operation of the Republic of Slovenia Act September 2017 Resolution, November 2018 Decree, and Development Cooperation and Humanitarian Aid Strategy of the Republic of Slovenia until 2030, providing a framework for multilateral activities and scope to enhance bilateral co-operation. Slovenia targets four Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): 1) decent work and economic growth; 2) sustainable consumption and production; 3) climate action; and 4) peaceful and inclusive societies.

Slovenia provided more ODA in 2019 than in the previous year. Total ODA on a grant-equivalent basis stood at USD 86 million (preliminary data), representing 0.16% of Slovenia’s gross national income (GNI) in 2019.1 The increase of 5.8% in real terms from 2018 was largely due to an increase in imputed student costs and in-donor refugee costs. Slovenia’s ODA has stayed at 0.16% of its GNI since peaking at 0.19% in 2016. Its ODA/GNI ratio ranked 22nd among DAC member countries in 2019. Slovenia is committed, at the European level, to achieve 0.33% ODA/GNI and collectively achieve a 0.7% ODA/GNI ratio by 2030. Total ODA on a grant-equivalent basis has the same value as net ODA under the cash-flow methodology used in the past, as Slovenia provides only grants.2

Most of Slovenia’s ODA is provided multilaterally, primarily to the EU institutions. Over half of bilateral ODA is provided to upper middle-income countries in the Western Balkans and Eastern Europe, supporting education, energy and aid for trade. Slovenia performs above the DAC average on its support to gender equality, environment and climate change. Humanitarian assistance fell slightly short of the 10% target. See the methodological notes for details on the definitions and statistical methodologies applied.

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!
Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!

In 2018, the largest proportion of Slovenia’s ODA (65%) was provided as core contributions to multilateral organisations, including the EU institutions. Gross bilateral ODA was 35% of total ODA, of which 12% was channelled through multilateral organisations (earmarked contributions).

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!

In 2018, Slovenia decreased its total support (core and earmarked contributions) to multilateral organisations. It provided USD 58 million of gross ODA to the multilateral system, a fall of 1.0% in real terms from 2017. Of this, USD 54 million was core multilateral ODA and the rest was earmarked for a specific country, region, theme or purpose. Project aid earmarked for a specific project or purpose (tight earmarking) accounted for 9% of Slovenia’s non-core contributions, while the remaining 91% was softly earmarked (to pooled funds and specific-purpose programmes and funds).

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!

In 2018, Slovenia’s total contribution to multilateral organisations was mainly allocated to the EU institutions, the United Nations (UN) and the World Bank Group. These contributions together accounted for more than 92% of Slovenia’s total support to the multilateral system. The UN system received 5%, mainly through core contributions. Out of a total gross volume of USD 3 million to the UN system, the top three UN recipients of Slovenia’s support (core and earmarked contributions) were: the UN Department of Peace Operations (USD 0.5 million), the Food and Agriculture Organization (USD 0.4 million) and the UN Secretariat (USD 0.4 million).

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!
Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!

Note: See the list of UN acronyms.

See the section on “Geographic and thematic focus of ODA” for the geographical and thematic breakdown of bilateral allocations earmarked through the multilateral development system. Learn more about multilateral development finance.

In 2018, Slovenia increased its bilateral spending compared to the previous year. It provided USD 29 million as gross bilateral ODA (including earmarked contributions to multilateral organisations), which represented an increase of 9.9% in real terms from 2017.

In 2019, providers of development co-operation started voluntarily reporting to the OECD data on how ODA focuses on the SDGs for 2018 activities. In 2018, Slovenia focused most of its bilateral ODA on addressing the goals of the UN 2030 Agenda for education, climate action, and responsible consumption and production.

In 2018, country programmable aid was 32% of Slovenia’s gross bilateral ODA, compared to a DAC country average of 49%. In-donor refugee costs were USD 2 million in 2018, an increase of 144% in real terms over 2017, and represented 3% of Slovenia’s total net ODA.

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!

Note: NGO: non-governmental organisation.

In 2018, Slovenia channelled its bilateral ODA mainly through the public sector and multilateral organisations, as earmarked funding.

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!

Note: NGO: non-governmental organisation; PPP: public-private partnership.

In 2018, civil society organisations (CSOs) received USD 2 million of gross bilateral ODA. One per cent of gross bilateral ODA was allocated to CSOs as core contributions and 6% was channelled through CSOs to implement projects initiated by Slovenia (earmarked funding). Between 2017 and 2018, core and earmarked contributions to CSOs remained stable at 8% of bilateral ODA. Learn more about ODA allocations to and through CSOs and civil society engagement in development co-operation.

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!

In 2018, Slovenia’s bilateral ODA was primarily focused on Europe. USD 20 million was allocated to ODA-eligible countries in Europe and USD 2 million to Asia, accounting respectively for 68% and 5% of gross bilateral ODA. Europe was the main regional recipient of Slovenia’s earmarked contributions to multilateral organisations. Twenty-four per cent of gross bilateral ODA was unspecified by region in 2018.

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!
Bilateral ODA by recipient country

In 2018, 70% of gross bilateral ODA went to Slovenia’s top 10 recipients. Six of its top 10 recipients are in the Western Balkans, in line with Slovenia’s policy priorities. The share of gross bilateral ODA that was not allocated by country was 26%, mainly due to expenditure for in-donor refugees.

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!
Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!

In 2018, least developed countries (LDCs) received 2.0% of Slovenia’s gross bilateral ODA (USD 1 million), compared with the DAC country average of 23.8%. Slovenia allocated the highest share of gross bilateral ODA (58%) to upper middle-income countries in 2018, reflecting its bilateral focus on countries in its immediate neighbourhood. Twenty-six per cent was unallocated by income group.

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!

Note: LDC: least developed country; LIC: low-income country; LMIC: lower middle-income country; UMIC: upper middle-income country; MADCTs: more advanced developing countries and territories.

Support to fragile contexts reached USD 2 million of gross bilateral ODA in 2018 (5.6% of gross bilateral ODA). Extremely fragile contexts received 18.6% of this amount. Learn more about support to fragile contexts on the States of Fragility platform.

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!

Note: The chart represents only gross bilateral ODA that is allocated by country.

In 2018, most of Slovenia’s bilateral ODA was allocated to social infrastructure and services. Investments in this area accounted for 53% of bilateral ODA commitments (USD 19 million), with a strong focus on education (USD 12 million). ODA for economic infrastructure and services totalled USD 6 million, almost all of which focused on energy (USD 5.7 million). Bilateral humanitarian aid amounted to USD 3 million (9% of bilateral ODA). Earmarked contributions to multilateral organisations focused also on social infrastructure and services in 2018.

In 2018, Slovenia committed USD 6.3 million (33.9% of bilateral allocable aid) to promote aid for trade and improve developing countries’ trade performance and integration into the world economy in 2018.

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!
Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!

In 2018, Slovenia committed 62% of its bilateral allocable aid to gender equality and women’s empowerment as either a principal or significant objective (up from 51% in 2017),3 compared with the DAC country average of 42%. This is equal to USD 5 million of bilateral ODA commitments in support of gender equality. Out of this, the share of bilateral allocable aid committed to gender equality and women’s empowerment as a principal objective was 11%, compared with the DAC country average of 4%. All interventions on population and reproductive health address gender equality, as do a very high share of interventions on production and other social services. However, interventions in education, and government and civil society do not. Slovenia screens slightly less than half of its interventions against the gender marker (46.6% in 2018). Learn more about ODA focused on gender equality and the DAC Network on Gender Equality.

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!

In 2018, Slovenia committed 54% of its bilateral allocable aid (USD 10 million) in support of the environment as either a principal or significant objective, up from 30% in 2017 (the DAC country average was 33%). Eleven per cent focused on environmental issues as a principal objective, equal to the DAC country average. Forty-four per cent (USD 8 million) focused on climate change as either a principal or significant objective, up from 11% in 2017 (the DAC country average was 26%). Slovenia has a similar focus on adaptation (44% in 2018) and mitigation (42%). Learn more about climate-related development finance.

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!
Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!

In 2018, Slovenia’s Ministries of Foreign Affairs, and Economic Development and Technology together mobilised USD 0.14 million from the private sector through simple co-financing arrangements.

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!

Of the country-allocable finance mobilised from the private sector in 2017-18, 68% targeted middle-income countries and 32% targeted LDCs.

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!

Note: LDC: least developed country; LMIC: lower middle-income country.

Slovenia’s private finance mobilised in 2017-18 related to activities in the agriculture, forestry and fishing (41%); general environmental protection (32%); and industry, mining and construction (27%) sectors. Learn more about the amounts mobilised from the private sector for development.

The Slovenian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) is the national co-ordinator for development co-operation, responsible for co-ordinating development co-operation policies and implementation between line ministries, and consulting with providers, the private sector, civil society and other stakeholders. The Permanent Coordination Group for International Development Cooperation plans, co-ordinates and monitors the implementation of development co-operation. In 2017, the Ministry of Finance disbursed the largest amount of ODA, primarily to multilateral institutions, followed by the MFA.

Share
Embed code for this view
Copy code
Code copied!

Slovenia’s Evaluation Policy (2014) mandates the MFA as the national co-ordinator of evaluation of development co-operation. Within the MFA, the evaluation unit of the Department for Development Cooperation and Humanitarian Assistance is in charge of evaluation and implements strategically important programme and thematic evaluations. The mandate covers the evaluation of all Slovenian ODA funds. The unit provides feedback to the MFA, other ministries and spending units on development co-operation processes, and is accountable to parliament and the public by reporting results of Slovenian development co-operation.

The tasks of the evaluation unit are to manage tenders, select the independent evaluators who conduct evaluations in line with evaluation policy and guidelines, and approve reports. Responsibility for the content of reports rests with the evaluators. Read more about Slovenia’s evaluation system.

Explore the Monitoring Dashboard of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation.

Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Slovenia, Directorate for Multilateral Affairs and Development Cooperation: https://www.gov.si/en/state-authorities/ministries/ministry-of-foreign-affairs/about-the-ministry/directorate-for-multilateral-affairs-and-development-cooperation

Resolution on Development Cooperation and Humanitarian Assistance of the Republic of Slovenia: https://www.gov.si/assets/ministrstva/MZZ/Dokumenti/multilaterala/razvojno-sodelovanje/Resolution-on-development-cooperation-and-humanitarian-assistance-of-the-Republic-of-Slovenia.pdf

Member of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) since 2013.

The methodological notes provide further details on the definitions and statistical methodologies applied, including the grant-equivalent methodology, core and earmarked contributions to multilateral organisations, country programmable aid, channels of delivery, bilateral ODA unspecified/unallocated, bilateral allocable aid, the gender equality policy marker, and the environment markers.

← 1. DAC members adopted the grant-equivalent methodology starting from their reporting of 2018 data as a more accurate way to count the provider’s effort in development loans. See the methodological notes for further details.

← 2. All 2019 statistics in this paragraph are expressed in current prices and, therefore, they may differ from values in the ODA volume chart, which uses constant prices.

← 3. The use of the recommended minimum criteria for the marker by some members in recent years can result in lower levels of aid reported as being focused on gender equality.

Metadata, Legal and Rights

This document, as well as any data and map included herein, are without prejudice to the status of or sovereignty over any territory, to the delimitation of international frontiers and boundaries and to the name of any territory, city or area. Extracts from publications may be subject to additional disclaimers, which are set out in the complete version of the publication, available at the link provided.

https://doi.org/10.1787/2dcf1367-en

© OECD 2020

The use of this work, whether digital or print, is governed by the Terms and Conditions to be found at http://www.oecd.org/termsandconditions.