Slovenia

Introduction

In April 2017, Slovenia’s National Assembly adopted the new International Development Co-operation of the Republic of Slovenia Act. This act is complemented by a September 2017 Resolution, a November 2018 Decree, and a December 2018 strategy on development cooperation and humanitarian assistance, which maintain Slovenia’s geographical priorities in the Western Balkans, the European neighbourhood and least developed countries (LDCs) in sub-Saharan Africa, with a specific focus on Montenegro and North Macedonia. The Resolution identifies two thematic priorities: 1) promoting peaceful and inclusive societies; and 2) sustainable management of natural and energy resources and the fight against climate change. It reaffirms Slovenia’s commitment to allocating at least 10% of its bilateral official development assistance (ODA) to humanitarian assistance. As mentioned in the 2017 DAC Peer Review, Slovenia is preparing an action plan to gradually increase ODA to 0.33% of gross national income (GNI) by 2030. This action plan is still under inter-ministerial co-ordination.

In 2017, the DAC Peer Review of Slovenia’s development co-operation recognised the government’s effort to build its development co-operation, suggesting a smaller geographic footprint which maximises Slovenia’s comparative advantage.

Official development assistance

In 2017, the majority of Slovenia’s ODA (67%) was provided multilaterally. While the majority of bilateral ODA went to priority countries in the Western Balkan region, just 35% was programmed with partner countries. In 2017, 51% of Slovenia’s bilateral sector-allocable aid supported gender equality and women’s empowerment, up from 18% in 2016, and 30% supported the environment.

In 2018, Slovenia provided USD 83 million in total ODA (preliminary data, current prices. This represented 0.16% of GNI. Slovenia’s 2018 net ODA represented an increase of 2.8% in real terms from 2017, due to an increase in bilateral aid and Slovenia’s contributions to the European Union.

Slovenia’s share of untied bilateral ODA (excluding administrative costs and in-donor refugee costs) was 99.6% in 2017 (up from 53.4% in 2016), while the DAC country average was 82.1%. The grant element of total ODA was 100% in 2017.

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In 2017, 33% of gross ODA was provided bilaterally, of which 16% was channelled through multilateral organisations (multi-bi/non-core contributions). Slovenia allocated 67% of total ODA as core contributions to multilateral organisations. Learn more about multilateral development finance.

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In 2017, country programmable aid was 35% of Slovenia’s bilateral ODA, compared to a DAC country average of 48% (see the methodological notes for further details on country programmable aid). Project-type interventions accounted for 45% of this aid.

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In 2017, Slovenia channelled 75.6% of gross bilateral ODA through the public sector (down from 81.4% in 2016). See the methodological notes for further details on channels of delivery.

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In 2017, USD 2 million of gross bilateral ODA was channelled to and through civil society organisations (CSOs). Between 2016 and 2017, ODA channelled to and through CSOs increased as a share of bilateral aid (from 7% to 8%). Learn more about ODA allocations to and through CSOs and the Civil Society Days.

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In 2017, bilateral ODA was primarily focused on Europe (USD 18.6 million), in line with Slovenia’s focus on its immediate neighbourhood.

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In 2017, 74.2% of gross bilateral ODA went to Slovenia’s top 10 recipients. Four of its top five recipients are priority countries in the Western Balkans region, in line with Slovenia’s focus on its immediate neighbourhood. Support to fragile contexts reached USD 0.9 million in 2017 (3.7% of gross bilateral ODA). Learn more about support to fragile contexts.

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In 2017, 1.8% of Slovenia’s gross bilateral ODA (USD 0.5 million) was allocated to the LDCs, compared with the DAC country average of 23.5%. Upper middle-income countries received the highest share of bilateral ODA in 2017 (63.1%), followed by lower middle-income countries (11.2%), noting that 23.8% was unallocated by income group.

At 0.03% of GNI in 2017, total ODA to the LDCs (including imputed multilateral flows) was lower than the UN target of 0.15-0.20% of GNI.

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In 2017, 70.4% of bilateral ODA commitments (USD 16 million) was committed to social infrastructure and services, with a focus on support to education (USD 10 million). Humanitarian aid amounted to USD 0.9 million. Slovenia also committed USD 1 million (11% of bilateral allocable aid) to promote aid for trade and improve developing countries’ trade performance and integration into the world economy in 2017.

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USD 3 million of gross bilateral allocable ODA supported gender equality. In 2017, 51% of Slovenia’s bilateral sector-allocable aid had gender equality and women’s empowerment as a principal or significant objective, compared with the DAC country average of 36%. Slovenia’s aid to population and reproductive health focuses on gender. Learn more about ODA focused on gender equality and the DAC Network on Gender Equality.

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USD 3 million of bilateral ODA commitments supported the environment. In 2017, 30% of its gross bilateral allocable aid supported the environment and 11% (USD 1 million) focused on climate change, compared with the respective DAC country averages of 33% and 25%. Allocations supporting the environment increased from 24% in 2016, while those focused on climate change increased from 10% in 2016. The proportion of bilateral allocable ODA focusing specifically on adaptation increased from 8% in 2016 to 9% in 2017 and the proportion focusing specifically on mitigation increased from 5% to 7%. Learn more about climate-related development finance.

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Other financial flows and amounts mobilised from the private sector

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Institutional set-up

The Slovenian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) is the national co-ordinator for development co-operation, responsible for co-ordinating development co-operation policies and implementation between line ministries, and consulting with providers, the private sector, civil society and other stakeholders. The Permanent Coordination Group for International Development Cooperation plans, co-ordinates and monitors implementation of development co-operation. In 2017, the Ministry of Finance disbursed the largest amount of ODA (USD 39.6 million), primarily to multilateral institutions, followed by the MFA (USD 18.7 million). Other ministries and agencies disbursed USD 17.5 million.

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Evaluation system

Slovenia’s Evaluation Policy (2014) mandates the MFA as the national co-ordinator of evaluation of development co-operation. Within the MFA, the evaluation unit of the Department for Development Cooperation and Humanitarian Assistance is in charge of evaluation and implements extensive, strategically important programme and theme-specific evaluations. The mandate covers the evaluation of all Slovenian ODA funds. The unit provides feedback to the MFA, other ministries and spending units on development co-operation processes, and is accountable to parliament and the public by reporting results of Slovenian development co-operation.

The tasks of the evaluation unit are to manage tenders, select the independent evaluators, who conduct evaluations in line with evaluation policy and guidelines, and approve reports. Responsibility for the content of reports rests with the evaluators. Read more about Slovenia’s evaluation system.

Performance against the commitments for effective development co-operation

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Explore the Monitoring Dashboard of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation.

Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Slovenia: www.mzz.gov.si/en/foreign_policy_and_international_law/international_development_cooperation_and_humanitarian_assistance/documents

Member of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) since 2013.

Slovenia