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Regional Development Policies in OECD Countries

image of Regional Development Policies in OECD Countries

Policy makers need both a handy reference guide to the regional policies of their own and other countries and a broader analysis of trends in regional policies, based on sound, comparable information. Regional Policies in OECD Countries responds to this need. It is the first systematic, comparative analysis of OECD countries’ regional policies.  

The report addresses fundamental regional policy concerns, such as: problem recognition; the objectives of regional policy; the legal/institutional framework; the urban/rural framework; budget structures; and the governance mechanisms linking national and sub-national governments as well as sectors.  

It begins with an overview of the regional policy today. This is followed by country profiles covering the 31 OECD members. The profiles share a common conceptual framework, allowing countries to see how their experiences measure up. The report also contains several annexes, which cover some of the countries that are candidates for accession to the OECD or with which the OECD has enhanced engagement. The annexes also cover the key topics of cross-border cooperation and trends in urban-rural linkages, especially efforts to control urban sprawl.  

The report will help countries to better understand regional policies and to formulate and diffuse horizontal policy recommendations. The analysis suggests an important role for regional policies in shaping sustainable endogenous development, in particular well-developed governance mechanisms to better respond to the different opportunities and demands of regions and to improve policy efficiency.  

This report is a unique source of regional policy information and of special interest to policy makers, researchers, and others engaging with regional development.

English

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Portugal

In Portugal, the urban/rural divide commonly found in OECD member countries has translated in a gap between dynamic and densely populated urban areas (mainly along the coast) and declining low-density rural areas (concentrated in the interior of the country). Regional disparities are less visible in terms of GDP per capita than in terms of unemployment rates, educational attainment, and R&D investment. Accordingly, strong variations of competitiveness across regions are increasingly regarded as a challenge.

English

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