Romania

Introduction

Romania’s development co-operation is provided in line with Law No. 13/2016 that regulates development co-operation and humanitarian aid financed with Romanian public funds. The law sets the strategic objectives, programmatic and institutional framework, as well as financing and implementation modalities of Romania’s development co-operation. Romania has been reporting to the OECD since 2015 on its development co-operation programme at activity level and participates in the DAC Working Party on Statistics on Development Finance Statistics (WP-STAT). In 2018, Romania became a Participant in the OECD Development Assistance Committee.

Official development assistance

In 2018, Romania provided USD 252 million in total official development assistance (ODA) (preliminary data). This represented 0.11% of gross national income (GNI). Since Romania did not extend any loans in 2018, its total ODA is the same using the new “grant-equivalent” methodology (see the methodological notes for further details) adopted by DAC members on their reporting of 2018 data as a more accurate way to count the donor effort in development loans and the “cash-flow basis” methodology used in the past. Total ODA for 2018 represented an increase of 10.1% in real terms from 2017, due to an increase in its bilateral aid.

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In 2017, 17.7% of gross ODA was provided bilaterally, of which 17% was channelled through multilateral organisations (multi-bi/non-core contributions). Romania allocated 82.3% of total ODA as core contributions to multilateral organisations.

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In 2017, 80.7% of bilateral ODA was programmed with partner countries, making Romania’s share of country programmable aid higher than the average for development providers beyond the DAC of 27.4% (see the methodological notes for further details on country programmable aid). Project-type interventions accounted for 0.31% of this aid.

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In 2017, Romania channelled 83% of gross bilateral ODA through the public sector (the same level as in 2016). In 2017, Romania channelled 0.3% of its ODA through public-private partnerships but did not channel its ODA through private sector institutions. See the methodological notes for further details on channels of delivery.

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In 2017, no bilateral ODA was channelled to and through civil society organisations (CSOs), but 0.15% of bilateral ODA was channelled to CSOs through the United Nations Development Programme. Between 2016 and 2017, ODA channelled to and through CSOs decreased as a share of bilateral aid (from 3% to 0.15%).

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In 2017, bilateral ODA was primarily focused on Europe. USD 27.9 million was allocated to Europe, USD 0.8 million to Asia and USD 8.1 million to the Middle East. USD 0.6 million was allocated to sub-Saharan Africa. Bilateral allocations to sub-Saharan Africa were stable compared to 2016.

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In 2017, 90.9% of gross bilateral ODA went to Romania’s top 10 recipients. Its top 10 recipients are in Europe, where Romania has programmes with five countries, in line with its focus on its immediate neighbourhood. Support to fragile contexts reached USD 9.2 million in 2017 (23.6% of gross bilateral ODA). Learn more about support to fragile contexts.

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In 2017, 1.4% of Romania’s gross bilateral ODA (USD 0.5 million) was allocated to the least developed countries (LDCs). This is down from 1.6% in 2016 and is lower than the average of providers beyond the DAC of 12.3% in 2017. Lower middle-income countries received the highest share of bilateral ODA in 2017 (69.6%), noting that 3.8% was unallocated by income group.

At 0.02% of GNI in 2017, total ODA to the LDCs was lower than the UN target of 0.15-0.20% of GNI. This includes imputed multilateral flows, i.e. making allowance for contributions through multilateral organisations, calculated using the geographical distribution of multilateral disbursements.

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In 2017, 89.6% of bilateral ODA commitments were allocated to social infrastructure and services, for a total of USD 60.4 million, with a strong focus on support to education (USD 60.1 million). Humanitarian aid amounted to USD 6 million. Romania did not commit any amounts to aid for trade in 2017.

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USD 35 million of gross bilateral allocable ODA supported gender equality. In 2017, 90% of Romania’s bilateral sector-allocable aid had gender equality and women’s empowerment as a principal or significant objective (down from 95% in 2016). Learn more about ODA focused on gender equality and the DAC Network on Gender Equality.

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Institutional set-up

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs co-ordinates Romania’s development co-operation and humanitarian aid policy. It monitors the progress made in achieving the objectives and commitments assumed by Romania, reports annually to the government on its activities, and concludes funding agreements. Law No. 213/2016 created the Romanian Agency for International Development Co-operation (RoAid), which is responsible for implementing projects and programmes in the field of international development co-operation and humanitarian aid. It is also responsible for tasks such as budgetary programming, budgetary execution, project monitoring and evaluation. In addition, an Advisory Committee for international development co-operation and humanitarian aid is responsible for ensuring the unity of strategic planning and consensual establishment of geographic and thematic priorities to be pursued in the activities carried out by the Romanian state.

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Performance against the commitments for effective development co-operation

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Explore the Monitoring Dashboard of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation.

Additional resources

Romanian Agency for International Development (RoAid): http://roaid.ro/en/2382-2/

Participant in the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC).

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