Israel

Introduction

On 23 July 2018, Israel approved Cabinet Resolution No. 4021 “Advancing Israeli Activity in the Field of International Development”. The aim of the resolution is to reform Israel’s development strategy and to create an inter-ministerial committee that is dedicated to international development. This is closely linked to and strongly aligned with Israel’s government policy to further advance Israel’s position as a contributor to international development. Israel is well-established in the fields of agriculture, water and health, which can help contribute to meeting the global development challenges. Israel also aims to strengthen its ties with target countries in order to identify areas for further trade and co-operation.

The Director General in the Prime Minister’s Office has been appointed as the head of the newly created inter-ministerial committee. The committee seeks to reach out to ministers who could contribute and be involved in its global development initiatives. The committee will also examine ways to involve the private sector and introduce Israeli innovation on development co-operation. Israel’s ultimate goal is to increase its international development activity and perhaps in the foreseeable future to create a development finance institution.

Official development assistance

In 2018, Israel provided USD 434.3 million in total official development assistance (ODA) (preliminary data). This represented 0.12% of gross national income (GNI). Israel did not extend loans in 2018, so that its total ODA is the same using the new “grant-equivalent” methodology (see the methodological notes for further details) adopted by DAC members on their reporting of 2018 data as a more accurate way to count the donor effort in development loans and under the “cash-flow basis” methodology used in the past. Total ODA for 2018 represented an increase of 6.5% in real terms from 2017, due to increases in contributions to regional development banks.

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Note: The graphs refer to 2016 data, as 2017 data were reported to the OECD after the database was closed.

In 2017, 95% of gross ODA was provided bilaterally. Israel allocated 5% of total ODA as core contributions to multilateral organisations.

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Note: The graphs refer to 2016 data, as 2017 data were reported to the OECD after the database was closed.

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Note: The graphs refer to 2016 data, as 2017 data were reported to the OECD after the database was closed.

In 2017, bilateral ODA was primarily focused on Asia. USD 231.06 million were allocated to Asia, of which USD 149.77 million went to the Middle East. However, the biggest share of Israel’s bilateral ODA, USD 123 million (32% of bilateral ODA), falls under “developing countries, unspecified”.

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In 2017, 64.2% of gross bilateral ODA went to Israel’s top 10 recipients. Its top 10 recipients are mainly in the Middle East, and Asia, with the Syrian Arab Republic, Jordan and the People’s Republic of China the biggest recipients. Support to fragile contexts reached USD 215 million in 2017 (55% of gross bilateral ODA). Learn more about support to fragile contexts.

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In 2017, 0.7% of Israel’s gross bilateral ODA (USD 2.7 million) was allocated to the least developed countries (LDCs). This is down from 1.2% in 2016, and lower than the average of providers beyond the DAC of 12.3% in 2017. Lower middle-income countries received USD 204.2 million (53%).

At 0.08% of GNI in 2017, total ODA to the LDCs was lower than the UN target of 0.15-0.20% of GNI. This includes imputed multilateral flows, i.e. making allowance for contributions through multilateral organisations, calculated using the geographical distribution of multilateral disbursements.

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Note: The graphs refer to 2016 data, as 2017 data were reported to the OECD after the database was closed.

Institutional set-up

Israel’s Agency for International Development Co-operation – MASHAV, a division of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs – is in charge of planning, implementing and co-ordinating Israel’s development co-operation.

Additional resources

Israel’s Agency for International Development Cooperation (MASHAV): https://mfa.gov.il/MFA/mashav/Pages/default.aspx

Member of the OECD since 2010. Not a member of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC).

Israel