Lithuania

Introduction

Lithuanian Law on Development Cooperation and Humanitarian Aid, adopted in 2013 and updated in 2016, envisages main principles of development cooperation: partnership with partner countries, partner country’s ownership, solidarity, efficiency, transparency and responsibility, coordination and complementarity, and policy coherence. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Lithuania is responsible for implementing and co-ordinating Lithuania’s development co-operation.

Official development assistance

In 2018, Lithuania provided USD 58.9 million in total official development assistance (ODA) (preliminary data). This represented 0.11% of gross national income (GNI). Since Lithuania did not extend any loans in 2018, its total ODA is the same using the new “grant-equivalent” methodology (see the methodological notes for further details) adopted by DAC members on their reporting of 2018 data as a more accurate way to count the donor effort in development loans and the “cash-flow basis” methodology used in the past. Total ODA for 2018 represented a decrease of 7.3% in real terms from 2017, due to a decrease in its bilateral aid projects.

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In 2017, 26% of gross ODA was provided bilaterally, of which 31% was channelled through multilateral organisations (multi-bi/non-core contributions). Lithuania allocated 74% of total ODA as core contributions to multilateral organisations.

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In 2017, 21.8% of bilateral ODA was programmed with partner countries, making Lithuania’s share of country programmable aid higher than the average for development providers beyond the DAC of 27.4% (see the methodological notes for further details on country programmable aid). Project-type interventions accounted for 71% of this aid.

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In 2017, Lithuania channelled 59.4% of gross bilateral ODA through the public sector (down from 73.1% in 2016). In 2017, Lithuania channelled 3.7% of its ODA through universities or other teaching and research institutions and 2.5% through public-private partnerships, but did not channel its ODA through private sector institutions. See the methodological notes for further details on channels of delivery.

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In 2017, USD 0.5 million of gross bilateral ODA was channelled to and through civil society organisations (CSOs). Between 2016 and 2017, ODA channelled to and through CSOs decreased as a share of bilateral aid (from 5.1% to 3.3%).

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In 2017, bilateral ODA was primarily focused on Europe. USD 5.4 million was allocated to Europe and USD 0.1 million was allocated to sub-Saharan Africa. Bilateral allocations to sub-Saharan Africa increased compared to 2016.

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In 2017, 21% of gross bilateral ODA went to Lithuania’s top 10 recipients. Its top 10 recipients are in Europe, Central Asia and the Middle East, where Lithuania has programmes with seven countries, in line with its focus on its immediate neighbourhood. Support to fragile contexts reached USD 0.3 million in 2017 (1.7% of gross bilateral ODA). Learn more about support to fragile contexts.

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In 2017, 1% of Lithuania’s gross bilateral ODA (USD 0.2 million) was allocated to the least developed countries (LDCs). This is up from 0.5% in 2016 and significantly lower than the average of providers beyond the DAC of 12.3% in 2017. Lower middle-income countries received 12.9% of bilateral ODA in 2017, while upper middle-income countries received 9.6%, noting that 76.4% was unallocated by income group.

At 0.02% of GNI in 2017, total ODA to the LDCs was lower than the UN target of 0.15-0.20% of GNI. This includes imputed multilateral flows, i.e. making allowance for contributions through multilateral organisations, calculated using the geographical distribution of multilateral disbursements.

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In 2017, 23.5% of bilateral ODA commitments was allocated to social infrastructure and services, for a total of USD 3.6 million, with a strong focus on support to education (USD 2.3 million). Humanitarian aid amounted to USD 0.6 million. Lithuania also committed USD 0.5 million (5.7% of bilateral allocable aid) to promote aid for trade and improve developing countries’ trade performance and integration into the world economy in 2017.

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USD 1.7 million of gross bilateral allocable ODA supported gender equality. In 2017, 9.1% of Lithuania’s bilateral sector-allocable aid had gender equality and women’s empowerment as a principal or significant objective (up from 8.4% in 2016). Learn more about ODA focused on gender equality and the DAC Network on Gender Equality.

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USD 0.3 million of bilateral ODA commitments supported the environment. In 2017, 3% of its gross bilateral allocable aid supported the environment and 2.3% (USD 0.2 million) focused on climate change.

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Learn more about climate-related development finance.

Institutional set-up

The Law on Development Co-operation and Humanitarian Aid, adopted in 2013 and updated with a new edition in 2016, provides the framework for Lithuania’s development co-operation policy and outlines its mission, goals, principles, priorities, responsibilities and financing. The main principles of Lithuania’s development co-operation are: partnership with partner countries, partner country’s ownership, solidarity, efficiency, transparency and responsibility, co-ordination and complementarity, and policy coherence.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs is responsible for implementing and co-ordinating Lithuania’s development co-operation and takes an active role in encouraging Lithuanian national and municipal authorities and bodies, non-governmental organisations, and the private sector to take a stronger role in implementing the 2030 Agenda in partner countries. In 2017, to improve the quality and effectiveness of its ODA, project management functions were partly transferred from the ministry to the new Central Project Management Agency (which should develop gradually into a full-fledged Lithuanian Development Co-operation Agency). In 2017, representatives of business associations were also incorporated into the National Development Co-operation Commission, which plays a key role in ensuring policy coherence for development.

Lithuania’s inter-governmental Development Co-operation Action Plan for the period 2018-20 aims to support effective development policies in line with achieving the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 and in accordance with the needs of partner countries. Twenty governmental bodies and other public institutions have committed to implement the action plan and allocate funds for development co-operation.

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Performance against the commitments for effective development co-operation

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Explore the Monitoring Dashboard of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation.

Additional resources

Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Lithuania, Development Cooperation Department: https://www.orangeprojects.lt/en/

Member of the OECD since 2018. Not a member of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC). Reporting to the OECD since 2001.

Lithuania