copy the linklink copied!How’s Life in the Slovak Republic?

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The Slovak Republic’s current well-being, 2018 or latest available year
The Slovak Republic’s current well-being, 2018 or latest available year

Note: This chart shows the Slovak Republic’s relative strengths and weaknesses in well-being compared to other OECD countries. Longer bars always indicate better outcomes (i.e. higher wellbeing), whereas shorter bars always indicate worse outcomes (lower well-being) – including for negative indicators, marked with an *, which have been reverse-scored. Inequalities (gaps between top and bottom, differences between groups, people falling under a deprivation threshold) are shaded with stripes, and missing data in white.

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The Slovak Republic’s resources for future well-being, 2018 or latest available year
The Slovak Republic’s resources for future well-being, 2018 or latest available year

Note: =top-performing OECD tier, =middle-performing OECD tier, =bottom-performing OECD tier. ➚ indicates consistent improvement; ↔ indicates no clear or consistent trend; ➘ indicates consistent deterioration, and “…” indicates insufficient time series to determine trends since 2010. For methodological details, see the Reader’s Guide of How’s Life? 2020.

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For more information

Access the complete publication, including information about the methods used to determine trends at: https://doi.org/10.1787/9870c393-en.

Find the data used in this country profile at: http://oecd.org/statistics/Better-Life-Initiative-2020-country-notes-data.xlsx.

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Deprivations in the Slovak Republic
Deprivations in selected indicators of current well-being, 2018 or latest available year
Deprivations in the Slovak Republic

Note: Relative income poverty refers to the share of people with household disposable income below 50% of the national median; financial insecurity refers to the share of individuals who are not income poor, but whose liquid financial assets are insufficient to support them at the level of the national relative income poverty line for at least three months; housing cost overburden refers to the share of households in the bottom 40% of the income distribution spending more than 40% of their disposable income on housing costs; and low satisfaction with life and with time use refer to the share of the population rating their satisfaction as 4 or lower (on a 0-10 scale).

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Inequalities between men and women in the Slovak Republic
Gender ratios (distance from parity) for selected indicators of current well-being, 2018 or latest available year
Inequalities between men and women in the Slovak Republic

Note: Grey bubbles denote no clear difference between men and women, defined as gender ratios within 0.03 points distance to parity.

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Inequalities between age groups in the Slovak Republic
Age ratios (distance from parity) for selected indicators of current well-being, 2018 or latest available year
Inequalities between age groups in the Slovak Republic

Note: Age ranges differ according to each indicator and are only broadly comparable. They generally refer to 15-24/29 years for young people, 25/30 to 45/50 years for the middle-aged and 50 years and over for older people. See How’s Life? 2020 for further details. Grey bubbles denote no clear difference between age groups, defined as age ratios within 0.03 points distance to parity.

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Inequalities between people with different educational attainment in the Slovak Republic
Education ratios (distance from parity) for selected indicators of current well-being, 2018 or latest available year
Inequalities between people with different educational attainment in the Slovak Republic

Note: Grey bubbles denote no clear difference between groups with different educational attainment, defined as education ratios within 0.03 points distance to parity.

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Inequalities between top and bottom performers in the Slovak Republic
Vertical inequalities for selected indicators of current well-being, 2018 or latest available year
Inequalities between top and bottom performers in the Slovak Republic

Note: For all figures, countries are ranked from left (most unequal) to right (least unequal).

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Trends in current well-being since 2010 in the Slovak Republic - I
Trends in current well-being since 2010 in the Slovak Republic - I

Note: The snapshot depicts data for 2018, or the latest available year, for each indicator. The colour of the circle indicates the direction of change, relative to 2010, or the closest available year: = consistent improvement, = consistent deterioration, = no clear trend, and white for insufficient time series to determine trends. The OECD average is marked in black. For methodological details, see the Reader’s Guide of How’s Life? 2020. * = Purchasing Power Parity.

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Trends in current well-being since 2010 in the Slovak Republic - II
Trends in current well-being since 2010 in the Slovak Republic - II

Note: See note on page 7.

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https://doi.org/10.1787/9870c393-en

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