1887

OECD Journal: Competition Law and Policy

  • Discontinued

This journal draws on the best of the recent work done for and by the OECD Committee on Competition Law and Policy. Its articles provide insight into the thinking a competition law enforcers, and focus on the practical application of competition law and policy. Here’s what Robert Pitofsky, Chairman of the US Federal Trade Commission said about this new journal when it was launched: “Global competition is the wave of the future, and comparative analysis of the laws and practices of various members of the worldwide community of nations is a necessary corollary. This new OECD Journal of Competition Law and Policy, compiled from OECD Round Table discussions, summaries of recent developments, and articles on topics of special interest, will introduce regulators, practitioners, and scholars to different regulatory approaches around the world and will allow us to consider in a more informed way the strengths and weaknesses of our own systems.”

Now published as part of the OECD Journal package.

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Promoting Competition in the Natural Gas Industry

Natural gas is a key source of energy for OECD countries, both in its own right and as an input into the production of electricity. Regulatory reform in this sector shares both important similarities and important differences with regulatory reform in other network industries. Like other network industries, regulatory reform in natural gas involves promoting competition in the competitive segments of the industry (particularly competition between gas producers), the development of a robust regime for access to the remaining essential facilities, and structural separation between the competitive and non-competitive segments of the industry. OECD countries have pursued each of these steps, licensing independent producers, pricing access to pipeline infrastructure and separating gas production from transportation (although long-term take-or-pay contracts make this last reform more difficult). Unlike other network industries, however, the structure of the industry varies widely from country to country according to the number of domestic gas producers, the geographic location of pipelines and the uses to which natural gas is put. Countries which rely primarily on imported gas have less to gain from domestic reform and much to gain from reform in producing countries. As OECD gas sources diminish and reliance on imports increases, regulatory reform in natural gas will increasingly become an issue for international trade.

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