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Institutions Guaranteeing Access to Information

OECD and MENA Region

image of Institutions Guaranteeing Access to Information

Thanks to comparative tables and precise examples, this report offers an overall picture of the institutions guaranteeing access to information (IGAI) in OECD member countries. While it does not provide a comprehensive analysis of each of these institutions, it examines the legislation, the composition, and operation of the IGAIs as well as their missions regarding the spontaneous disclosure and appeals following access to information requests.

Similarly, the report carries out an overall analysis of the access to information legislation of Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, and Tunisia, and of the legal and practical context of their IGAIs. In particular, it offers ways to make the implementation of this legislation more effective, at a time when these countries’ citizens are very keen on increased access to information.

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Introduction

The right to access information plays an essential role in democratic, pluralist societies. Known in English as “sunshine laws,” this right allows the public to know more about state and public sector actions, and it constitutes the corollary of Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights: “Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.” Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted by the UN General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948. This right is applied with varying levels of strictness, depending on the country.

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