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Investment Reform Index 2010

Monitoring Policies and Institutions for Direct Investment in South-East Europe

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Using an innovative methodology, the Investment Reform Index 2010 (IRI 2010) monitors investment-related policy reforms in the economies of South-East Europe and compares these to best practices in the OECD area. Based on inputs from governments, the private sector, independent experts and multilateral organisations active in the region, the IRI 2010 assesses policies and institutional settings in eight fields of policy critical to domestic and foreign investors. These are: investment policy and promotion; human capital development; trade policy and facilitation; access to finance; regulatory reform and parliamentary processes; infrastructure for investment; tax policy analysis; and SME policy. For the economies examined, the IRI 2010 provides an independent and rigorous assessment of investment-related policy settings and reform against international good practice, guidance for policy reform and development and an evidence base with which to facilitate prioritisation of donor activities supporting investment and growth.

English

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Investment Reform Index 2010

Key Findings and Recommendations

South-East Europe (SEE) has progressively reduced restrictions to national treatment since completion of the previous Investment Reform Index (IRI 2006). Restrictions only remain in a limited number of sectors, e.g., arms production and manufacturing. The protection of physical property has been enhanced with the digitization of land registries and cadastral books. However, enforcement of intellectual property rights (IPR) remains a challenge. Consideration should be given to using designated IPR courts to expedite cases of IPR infringement. SEE economies should review procedures and criteria for acquiring business-related licenses and permits at the sub-national level (such as building/construction permits) and ensure their overall transparency. One option is to have investment promotion agencies function as one-stop shops for inward investors. The scope for additional privatisation-related investment is narrowing, while public private partnerships (PPP) are in their infancy. Policy makers in SEE are encouraged to exchange best practices on the design of PPP units, PPP-related legislation, cost-benefit analysis and monitoring, drawing for instance on the OECD Principles for Private Sector Participation in Infrastructure.

English

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