1887

Promoting Inclusive Growth

Challenges and Policies

image of Promoting Inclusive Growth

This volume discusses several policy challenges facing countries to achieve and sustain inclusive growth. The volume is based on the proceedings of a conference co-organised by the OECD Economics Department and the World Bank on 24-25 March 2011, which brought together academics and practitioners from advanced, emerging-market and developing economies. While discussions on strong growth typically focus on the pace of economic expansion, those on inclusiveness also delve into the patterns of growth and on how its benefits are shared among the various social groups. An important message that came out of the conference is that strong growth is not necessarily inclusive and that policy action is needed to make sure that pro-growth initiatives also foster inclusiveness.

English

.

Competition and innovation-driven inclusive growth

We investigate the strength of innovation-driven employment growth, the role of competition in stimulating and facilitating it, and whether it is inclusive. In a sample of over 26 000 manufacturing establishments across 71 countries (both OECD and developing), we find that firms that innovate in products or processes, or that have attained higher total factor productivity, exhibit higher employment growth than non-innovative firms. The strength of firms' innovation-driven employment growth is significantly positively associated with the share of the firms' workforce that is unskilled, debunking the conventional wisdom that innovation-driven growth is not inclusive in that it is focused on jobs characterized by higher levels of qualification. We also find that young firms have higher propensities for product or process innovation in countries with better Doing Business ranks (both overall and ranks for constituent components focused on credit availability and property registration). Firms generally innovate more and show greater employment growth if they are exposed to more information (through Internet use and membership in business organisations) and are exporters. The empirical results support the policy propositions that innovation is a powerful driver of employment growth, that innovation-driven growth is inclusive in its creation of unskilled jobs, and that the underlying innovations are fostered by a pro-competitive business environment providing ready access to information, financing, export opportunities, and other essential business services that facilitate the entry and expansion of young firms.

English

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error