1887

Business for Development 2008

Promoting Commercial Agriculture in Africa

image of Business for Development 2008

The changing pattern of international agricultural trade has profound implications for Africa. The book’s authors discuss these trade flows, map the corporate landscape of agro-food, (including the emergent indigenous sector), and assess trends in international development co-operation in the corporate sector. Particular focus is given to “aid for trade” programmes that try to foster private-sector development and trade-capacity building. A final chapter, drawing lessons from five country case studies, provides evidence of the (in)effectiveness of government intervention and donor programmes to promote the marketing of African agriculture.

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Aid for Trade and African Agriculture

OECD Development Centre

In October 2006 the General Council of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) endorsed the recommendations of the Aid for Trade Task Force which was established at the WTO Hong Kong Ministerial Conference in 2005. One of the Task Force recommendations was to set up a monitoring and evaluation function in the WTO. In line with the Aid for Trade Roadmap in 2007, the WTO has recently hosted the first Global Aid for Trade Review. Its report analyses the self-assessments of Aid for Trade activities based on submissions from bilateral donors, international agencies and recipient countries. Global monitoring of Aid for Trade activities and in-country assessments are complementary and must go hand in hand with the greater participation of individual African countries. Against this backdrop, this chapter first presents a snapshot of Aid for Trade activities in Africa. Based on the OECD aid activity database, it highlights “who is doing what and how” in terms of institutions involved, volumes committed and instruments used to provide trade-related assistance in Africa. Second, this chapter takes a close look at the recent experience of donor support for productive capacity in African agriculture. Despite the fall of donor support during the 1980s and 1990s, aid to agriculture has remained among the top priority areas of assistance to building productive capacity in Africa; the agricultural sector, as broadly defined, attracted about $2 billion per annum during the period 2002-05.

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