Table of Contents

  • Corruption affects citizens’ perception of the national political system and undermines their trust in government and public institutions.

  • Corruption in the public administration and the capture of political decisions are risks to the economic and political stability of any country. Recognising this, the government of Argentina has been introducing reforms demonstrating its commitment to fight corruption. The law on liability of legal persons, the access to information law or the law of the repentant are examples of such progress, and cases of corruption are increasingly detected and investigated. Nonetheless, by investing more in addressing underlying structural weaknesses, Argentina could promote a culture of integrity that creates resilience to corruption and ensures sustainable and inclusive development.

  • This chapter analyses Argentina’s current institutional arrangements related to integrity policies. In particular, it calls for implementing the Public Ethics Law in all branches, and proposes to strengthen the policy dialogue between the executive, the legislative and the judiciary. A Federal Council for Integrity could promote, within the constitutional mandates, the development of integrity systems in the Provinces that are coherent with the national level while adapted to subnational realities. Furthermore, a strategic approach towards a National Integrity System in the executive branch could be encouraged through enhanced co-ordination between key actors. In addition, dedicated integrity contact points in each public entity could mainstream integrity policies throughout the national public administration. A National Integrity Strategy could provide both the strategic goals of the integrity system and allow an operationalisation at organisational levels. Finally, the chapter presents measures to strengthen the Anti-corruption Office, and in particular its preventive function and role as policy advisor.

  • This chapter provides recommendations on how Argentina could set up a central monitoring and evaluation system for its integrity policies. A central monitoring system for integrity policies would help to keep track of the implementation and facilitate evidence-informed communication with internal and external stakeholders. In turn, integrity policies should be evaluated to build knowledge and enable learning. Innovative integrity measures, in turn, could be rigorously tested through impact evaluations of pilots before implementing them on scale. In addition, the chapter provides guidance on how evidence could be gathered through staff and citizen surveys to inform the design, implementation and evaluation of integrity policies.

  • This chapter provides an overview of the strengths and weaknesses of the public ethics framework in Argentina. In particular it recommends addressing the current fragmentation of the public ethics framework by harmonising the different laws and regulations, developing a clear process for managing conflict of interest, updating and streamlining the Code of Ethics and strengthening efforts to build awareness of integrity in the public sector. Further efforts are also needed to reinforce merit in the public sector and to build and open and trusting environment to encourage public officials to raise concerns and report corruption.

  • This chapter identifies ways to strengthen the financial and interest disclosure system in Argentina by improving the submission process, verification and sanctions. While the financial and interest disclosure system in Argentina is characterised by a high degree of maturity the system could better serve its objectives of conflict of interest prevention and illicit enrichment detection by demanding further information on sources for conflict of interest. In addition, the oversight function by the enforcement authorities is currently restricted because they have no access to key information. Similarly, an improved online search function would enable civil society to scrutinise the declarations.

  • This chapter assesses Argentina’s internal control and risk management framework against international models and good practices from OECD member and non-member countries. It provides an overview of the strengths and weaknesses of the internal control and risk management framework in Argentina and proposals for how this framework could be reinforced, such as through implementing a strategic approach to risk management that incorporates integrity risks, establishing control committees in all government entities, and strengthening the mandate and independence of the external audit function.

  • This Chapter assesses the disciplinary regime for public sector employees in the executive branch of Argentina, focusing on duties and obligations related to integrity. It analyses the relevant legal framework and institutional responsibilities as well as the use of data and information related to the disciplinary system. The Chapter acknowledges the efforts to improve cooperation among some of the relevant institutions (Treasury Attorney General Office, Prosecutor Office for Administrative Investigations, Office of the Comptroller General) as well as to better coordinate disciplinary offices. At the same time, it highlights the need for a more coherent legal and institutional framework in order to prevent impunity and to support accountability and legitimacy of the integrity system of Argentina as a whole.

  • This chapter looks at the resilience of Argentina’s public decision-making processes with respect to the risk of capture of public policies by special interests. In this sense, Argentina could promote integrity and transparency in lobbying activities by extending the scope of its framework to other branches of government, improve the negative perception of lobbying through stakeholder participation and ensure that all actors involved are held to account. In turn, to enable elected representatives’ accountability the high degree of informality in political financing needs to be reduced, along with an increase in the effectiveness of monitoring and enforcement. In addition, efforts need to be made to expand political finance regulations to the provincial level in order to make the financing system more coherent. The achievement of all these goals also requires strengthening and implementing Argentina’s new Access to Public Information Law and the existing mechanisms to promote stakeholder engagement in the legislative and the executive branches.

  • This chapter covers Argentina’s efforts to cultivate a whole-of-society culture of integrity. It assesses the current integrity issues facing Argentine society, drawing from perception surveys describing the impact of corruption on society. This chapter also highlights the need for the Anti-Corruption Office to raise awareness in society on integrity in order to promote greater ownership amongst citizens about their shared responsibility for nurturing society’s integrity values. In addition, this chapter highlights the necessity of providing guidance to the private sector on cultivating cultures of integrity within companies. As well, it identifies the need to implement education programmes for children and young people into the existing civics curriculum.

  • To facilitate the policy dialogue in Argentina, the tables below provide an overview on the 198 actions proposed in each chapter of the Integrity Review. Together with clarifying the responsible unit(s), the tables also give a hint on whether the actions could be implemented in the short or medium term, or whether the action require a long term perspective. Clearly, for actions that would require legislative changes, for instance, a clear-cut responsibility cannot be attributed to a single unit and the outcome is uncertain. However, taking the OECD recommendation provided as a starting point, the government could commit nonetheless to advance discussions on how to move forward or even propose a draft regulation. Whenever possible, the table indicate which government entity could move forward such a proposal. Ideally, however, such discussions and proposals for legislative changes would be issues by the recommended Commission for Integrity and Transparency.