1887

Migration of Health Workers from Commonwealth Countries

Experiences and Recommendations for Action

image of Migration of Health Workers from Commonwealth Countries
In recent years there have been renewed concerns worldwide about the tremendous drain of resources that can occur when skilled health professionals migrate, particularly from developing to developed countries. Although such movement often has many advantages for the individuals concerned and their families, from the point of view of donor countries, it can have far-reaching consequences both for their economies and the development of their health services.



In the Commonwealth, migration of health professionals is a major problem for some member countries, particularly small states. In 1999, the Commonwealth Secretariat commissioned consultants to carry out literature reviews and to collect data from Ministries of Health in each of the four Commonwealth regions (Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and the Pacific), as a basis for recommending policies and strategic approaches to Commonwealth governments. This publication is based on a synthesis of the reports of these consultants.

English

.

Introduction

Concern about shortages of medical staff and the tremendous drain of resources that can occur when skilled health professionals migrate, particularly from developing to developed countries is not a new issue. These concerns were recognised at the Commonwealth Medical Conference held in Edinburgh in 1965. Subsequently international disquiet about this “brain drain” led to the setting up of the WHO Multinational Study of International Migration of Physicians and Nurses, the findings of which were published in 1979.

English

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error