OECD Regions at a Glance 2009
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OECD Regions at a Glance 2009

Well over one-third of the total economic output of OECD countries was generated by just 10% of OECD regions in 2005. This means the performance of regional economies and the effectiveness of regional policy matter more than ever. OECD Regions at a Glance is the one-stop guide for understanding regional competitiveness and performance, providing comparative statistical information at the sub-national level, graphs and maps. It identifies new ways that regions can increase their capacity to exploit local factors, mobilise resources and link with other regions. Measuring such factors as education levels, employment opportunities and intensity of knowledge-based activities, this publication offers a statistical snapshot of how life is lived – and can be improved – from region to region in the OECD area.

This third edition provides the latest comparable data and trends across regions in OECD countries, including a special focus on the spatial dimension for innovation. It relies on the OECD Regional database, the most comprehensive set of statistics at the sub-national level on demography, economic and labour market performance, education, healthcare, environmental outputs and knowledge-based activities comparable among the OECD countries. This publication provides a dynamic link (StatLink) for each graph and map, which directs the user to a web page where the corresponding data are available in Excel®.

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Publication Date :
23 Mar 2009
DOI :
10.1787/reg_glance-2009-en
 
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Author(s):
OECD
Pages :
7–10
DOI :
10.1787/reg_glance-2009-3-en

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International comparisons of economies and societies tend to be undertaken at the country level; statistics refer to gross national product, for example, while health and education levels tend similarly to be measured and debated in national terms. However, economic performance and social indicators can vary within countries every bit as much as they do between countries – think of the contrast between the north and the south of Italy, the dynamism of Silicon Valley and the stagnation of the "Rust Belt" in the United States, or highly urbanised London and the rural Shetland Islands. Understanding the differences and similarities in regional economic structures is essential for designing effective strategies which improve regional competitiveness and in turn increase national growth. 
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