Making the Most of Public Investment in the Eastern Slovak Republic
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Making the Most of Public Investment in the Eastern Slovak Republic

The Slovak Republic joined the European Union in 2004, the Schengen area in 2007 and the euro in 2009. These events, coupled with decentralisation reform and the creation of administrative regions, have brought significant change. While overall growth has been impressive compared to OECD countries overall, benefits have not accrued equally across the country. Public investment could potentially improve regional conditions and attract private funding, but governance bottlenecks stand in the way. This case study shows that the main obstacles to effective public investment are linked to high local fragmentation as well as the challenges national and subnational administrations face in designing and implementing investment strategies that correspond to local needs. Drawing on a detailed set of indicators, the study provides recommendations to address these challenges and make the most of public investment in the Slovak Republic.

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OECD

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The changes in the Slovak Republic’s socio-economic and governance landscape over the past 20 years are impressive. The Slovak Republic joined the European Union (EU) in 2004, entered the Schengen area in 2007 and adopted the euro in 2009. These events, coupled with decentralisation reform and the creation of administrative regions, have brought significant changes to the country as a whole. Between 2004 and 2008, GDP grew at an average annual rate of approximately 7%, dropping off in the face of the global financial crisis but rebounding to 2.5% in 2010- 13. Gross domestic product per capita at purchasing power parity has increased from 57% of the EU-28 average in 2004 to 75% in 2013.

 
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