OECD Green Growth Studies

English
ISSN: 
2222-9523 (online)
ISSN: 
2222-9515 (print)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/22229523
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The OECD Green Growth Strategy aims to provide concrete recommendations and measurement tools, including indicators, to support countries’ efforts to achieve economic growth and development, while ensuring that natural assets continue to provide the resources and environmental services on which well-being relies. The strategy proposes a flexible policy framework that can be tailored to different country circumstances and stages of development.

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Green Growth in Bangkok, Thailand

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English
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Author(s):
OECD
18 Aug 2015
Pages:
148
ISBN:
9789264237087 (PDF) ;9789264237070(print)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264237087-en

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This publication is the first case study of the Urban Green Growth in Dynamic Asia project. The project explores how to promote green growth in fast-growing cities in Asia by examining policies and governance practices that encourage greening and competitiveness in a rapidly expanding economy. It is part of the OECD Green Growth Studies series, which will culminate in a synthesis report on Urban Green Growth in Dynamic Asia.

This report analyses the economic and environmental performance and green growth policy practices of Thailand’s Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR). As a dynamic and emerging market economy, Thailand has recorded strong growth over recent decades and is expected to continue to do so, but this growth has come at a high environmental cost. The challenge is therefore to improve environmental outcomes while supporting continued growth in output and living standards. Thailand's government and BMA have taken steps to encourage green growth in the BMR, but much untapped potential remains, particularly in the following areas: land use and transport, renewable energy and energy efficiency in buildings, and water resources and solid waste management. Resilience to floods is also an urgent cross-cutting issue that requires further attention.

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  • Foreword

    This publication is the result of a study on urban green growth in the Bangkok Metropolitan Region, Thailand. It is the first case study of the Urban Green Growth in Dynamic Asia project. The project explores how to promote green growth in fastgrowing cities in Asia by examining policies and governance practices that encourage greening and competitiveness in a rapidly expanding economy. It contributes both to the OECD Green Growth Strategy and to the OECD Strategy on Development, as well as to ongoing discussions on the role of cities in tackling the urgent challenges of climate change. The project is part of the OECD Green Cities Programme, launched in 2010, which has conducted four metropolitan case studies (Paris, Chicago, Stockholm and Kitakyushu), two national case studies (China and Korea) and produced a synthesis report, Green Growth in Cities (2013).

  • Acronyms and abbreviations
  • Executive summary

    This report analyses the economic and environmental performance of Thailand’s Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR), assesses its policies and governance practices that promote green growth, and provides recommendations to enhance its green growth potential. Green growth aims to safeguard the natural assets, resources and environmental services on which our well-being relies. Cities play a critical role in national growth, but also generate negative externalities. They thus must be part of national solutions to stimulate growth and address climate change. Urban green growth policies encourage economic development while reducing either negative environmental externalities (for example, air pollution and carbon dioxide emissions that arise from urban activities) or the consumption of natural resources and environmental assets, including water, energy and undeveloped land.

  • Economic and environmental performance in the Bangkok Metropolitan Region

    Chapter 1 examines economic and environmental performance in the Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR). The first section, the socio-economic profile of the metropolitan area, explains how the pace of urbanisation is correlated with the evolution of economic activity, poverty, social equity and living conditions. It includes an assessment of: 1) demographic changes over time; 2) economic performance and diversity; and 3) long-term growth challenges. The second section addresses the greening challenges and the potential for green growth. It analyses the environmental performance of the city and indicates where opportunities for green growth lie. It includes an assessment of: 1) transport and land-use trends; 2) energy performance; 3) the risk of floods; and 4) water supply and wastewater treatment and solid waste management systems. The last section on the institutional profile of the metropolitan area analyses the main governance challenges facing the BMR. It includes an assessment of: 1) the influence of the national government on local affairs; and 2) the need for horizontal co-operation between all local jurisdictions in the BMR.

  • The Bangkok Metropolitan Region's opportunities for urban green growth

    Chapter 2 reviews current policies in the Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR) in the following six areas: energy, land use and transport, housing and buildings, water resource management, solid waste management, and green manufacturing and research and development (R&D). The analysis focuses on the following: 1) Current policies in each area. This will give more precise information on the actions taken by various authorities and the policy instruments and tools used to reach goals in each of these areas. It helps to identify gaps between existing opportunities and policy responses. 2) Policy outcomes. Where data were available, the impact of each policy is analysed to assess its effectiveness and to identify options for improvement. 3) Policy synergies and complementarities. To strengthen the impact of urban green growth policies, it is important to assess the extent to which the BMR has integrated areas of opportunity into coherent and effective policy packages. The results call for several urgent policy actions.

  • Building resilience to floods and other disasters in the Bangkok Metropolitan Region

    Chapter 3 examines the resilience of the Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR) to floods, which occur during the rainy season. It is critical to address this risk to ensure sustained and cost-effective urban green growth while adapting to the impacts of climate change, because precipitation and flooding affecting the region will likely increase in the future. This chapter analyses four critical elements for enhancing urban resilience to floods: 1) flood-resilient urban infrastructure in the BMR 2) flood-resilient land use in the BMR 3) the BMR’s economic resilience to floods 4) the BMR’s social resilience to floods. This chapter benefited from discussions at the Knowledge-Sharing Workshop on Urban Green Growth in Dynamic Asia, held in Bangkok on 6-7 August 2014, which was supported by the OECD Knowledge Sharing Alliance.

  • Governance for urban green growth in the Bangkok Metropolitan Region

    Chapter 4 examines strategies that can boost green growth in the Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR). Previous chapters analysed areas of opportunity for urban green growth in the BMR, while this chapter considers the existing tools and remaining challenges to make sure green growth policies have a concrete impact. The following issues require particular attention: 1) vertical and horizontal co-operation among various government jurisdictions in the BMR 2) the involvement of communities, civil society, the private sector, the media and research institutions 3) financing options 4) capacity-building activities 5) role and contributions of international co-operation agencies.

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