UN Chronicle

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Quarterly
ISSN: 
1564-3913 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/4db709e5-en
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The UN Chronicle is a must-read for every concerned world citizen. Produced by the United Nations Department of Public Information, this quarterly journal is your connection to the major political and social issues happening around the world today. In each issue, you'll read about international developments on a wide-range of topics including: human rights, economic, social and political issues, peacekeeping operations, international conferences and upcoming events. Every issue contains in-depth reviews and articles written by leading world figures, which provide an insightful look into the world today. The UN Chronicle also includes a review of current United Nations Security Council and General Assembly sessions.
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Article
 

What about people whose concern is their next meal, not internet connectivity? You do not have access to this content

English
 
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/53124cd0-en.pdf
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Author(s):
Divya Mansukhani, Samyak S. Chakrabarty
17 Apr 2012
Pages:
2
Bibliographic information
No.:
13,
Volume:
47,
Issue:
4
Pages:
29–30
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/53124cd0-en

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The ripples from the invention of the Internet in 1989 continue to spread, with industrialized countries at the centre and developing countries at the periphery. But, an information gap remains between the two groups of countries. As a consequence, the term “digital divide” has entered everyday language, describing the disparity between those who have access to the latest information and communication technologies and those who do not. However, it is important to explore the nature of the digital divide and of a social divide within each country between the “information rich” and the “information poor.”