UN Chronicle

Frequency
Quarterly
ISSN: 
1564-3913 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/4db709e5-en
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The UN Chronicle is a must-read for every concerned world citizen. Produced by the United Nations Department of Public Information, this quarterly journal is your connection to the major political and social issues happening around the world today. In each issue, you'll read about international developments on a wide-range of topics including: human rights, economic, social and political issues, peacekeeping operations, international conferences and upcoming events. Every issue contains in-depth reviews and articles written by leading world figures, which provide an insightful look into the world today. The UN Chronicle also includes a review of current United Nations Security Council and General Assembly sessions.
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Article
 

An integrated approach to development You do not have access to this content

English
 
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Author(s):
Anirudh Jagannatha Rao, Neeraja Mathur, Akorshi Sengupta
17 Apr 2012
Pages:
3
Bibliographic information
No.:
10,
Volume:
47,
Issue:
4
Pages:
22–24
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/fcb960fa-en

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Every day is a new beginning for hope and betterment in the village of Charampa in Orissa state, India. On an ordinary day two years ago, at the crack of dawn, Lila, a mother of three, hurried to the village well. She went to draw water for her home and for the tiny patch of land where she grows vegetables and jowar, barely producing enough for two meals a day. Today, due to erratic rainfall, the well had nearly gone dry and the land almost became infertile. Lila sighed, “My husband went to Cuttack to find work. He never returned. I have to feed the family. Without rain, what should I do? I have a ration card. We walk all the way to the fair-price shop, but there is nothing in stock or the grains are rotten!” Her eldest daughter, Mala, dropped out of school at age nine to help with the household chores and care for her younger siblings. School for Mala was humiliating—there was no closed toilet for girls.