ITF Round Tables

International Transport Forum

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English
ISSN: 
2074-336X (online)
ISSN: 
2074-3378 (print)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/2074336x
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ITF Roundtable Reports present the proceedings of ITF roundtable meetings, dedicated to specific topics notably on economic and regulatory aspects of transport policies in ITF member countries. Roundtable Reports contain the reviewed versions of the discussion papers presented by international experts at the meeting and a summary of discussions with the main findings of the meeting.

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Terrorism and International Transport

Terrorism and International Transport

Towards Risk-based Security Policy You do not have access to this content

English
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/7409031e.pdf
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Author(s):
ITF
28 Apr 2009
Pages:
150
ISBN:
9789282102329 (PDF) ;9789282102312(print)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789282102329-en

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Security is critical to transport systems as they are often appealing targets for terrorist attacks. The significant costs of potential damage make effective security policies a key concern for transport decision makers. This Round Table examines the contribution economic analysis can make to improving security in aviation and maritime shipping by identifying methods for quantifying the benefits of security measures and assessing their effectiveness, and examining techniques to allocate resources targeting the highest risks.
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  • Summary of discussions
    Security concerns are high on the political agenda in many countries because of the widespread perception that security is increasingly threatened by intentional malicious acts including terrorist attacks. While terrorism has a long history and measures to maintain and improve security are in place, major events – including but not limited to the 9/11 attacks – have triggered stronger action to improve security. In this context, much attention goes to maintaining secure transport for two reasons. First, many transport facilities and vehicles are appealing targets for terrorist attacks because of the concentration of potential victims. Second, transport can act as a conveyor for terrorist attacks, e.g. by moving weapons into ports or by turning airplanes into weapons. In both cases, the difficulties in protecting the many potential targets while maintaining smooth transport operations strengthens the appeal of transport targets.
  • Rational Behaviour, Risk Aversion: High Stakes for Society
    Certain areas related to the topics under discussion here lie outside my field; for instance the evaluation of risk assessment and security deficiencies in the transport sector. What has convinced me of the importance of this subject are a few very general conclusions, indeed I would say, impressions, that I have drawn from the truly remarkable development of our powers to analyse the risk decision-making process over some years now.
  • Economic Impact Analysis of Terrorism Events: Recent Methodological Advances and Findings
    National security is a basic responsibility of national governments, but it is also intangible. What can economic analysis contribute? Benefit-cost analysis has rarely been applied because of the ambiguous and commons nature of the benefits. Our group at the University of Southern California’s Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism (CREATE) has worked to elaborate and apply economic impact analysis to describe the expected losses from various hypothetical terrorist attacks. Our innovation has been to add a spatial dimension to operational inter-industry models.
  • Towards a Risk-based Aviation Security Policy
    The well-coordinated terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001 presented the world with a new aviation security threat: the capture of aircraft in flight to be used as human-guided missiles. The two previous threats – hijacking an aircraft for ransom and putting a bomb aboard an aircraft – had led to varying degrees of screening of baggage and passengers in developed countries, plus some use of on-board security personnel on selected flights in some countries.
  • Security and Risk-based Models in Shipping and Ports: Review and Critical Analysis
    The primary aim of maritime security assessment models is to assess the level of security within and across the maritime network. When managing risk through legislation, regulatory assessment models are used to assess risk levels and examine the impact of policy options, usually in terms of the costs and benefits of a regulatory proposal. This paper reviews the development, application and adequacy of existing risk assessment and management models to maritime and port security. In particular, we examine the problematical issues of security perception, value and impact, and discuss the limitations of the current regulatory framework in providing an integrated and effective approach to risk assessment and management, including for supply chain security.
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