Port Competition and Hinterland Connections
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Port Competition and Hinterland Connections

This Round Table publication discusses the policy and regulatory challenges posed by the rapidly changing port environment. The sector has changed tremendously in recent decades with technological and organisational innovation and a powerful expansion of trade. Although ports serve hinterlands that now run deep into continents, competition among ports is increasingly intense and their bargaining power in the supply chain has consequently weakened. Greater port throughput is meeting with increasing resistance from local communities because of pollution and congestion. In addition, local regulation is warranted but made difficult by the distribution of bargaining power among stakeholders. Higher-level authorities could develop more effective policies.
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/7409021e.pdf
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Chapter
 

Responding to increasing port-related freight volumes

lessons from los angeles/long beach and other us ports and hinterlands You do not have access to this content

English
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/7409021ec004.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/transport/port-competition-and-hinterland-connections/responding-to-increasing-port-related-freight-volumes_9789282102251-4-en
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Author(s):
Genevieve Giuliano, Thomas O’Brien

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Rapid growth in international trade over the last two decades has generated both benefits and costs. Costs have become increasingly visible in metropolitan areas – growing congestion, air pollution – and local communities are demanding solutions. Congestion and air pollution associated with increased international trade have become so severe in the Los Angeles region that port-related trade is facing increased regulation by both state and local agencies. Historically US ports have been remarkably autonomous. Their role as economic development engines is well-recognized by local leaders. Thus recent regulatory efforts represent a significant change in public policy.
Also available in French
 
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