World Social Science Report 2013
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World Social Science Report 2013

Changing Global Environments

Produced by the International Social Science Council (ISSC) and UNESCO, and published by the OECD, the 2013 World Social Science Report represents a comprehensive overview of the field gathering the thoughts and expertise of hundreds of social scientists from around the world.

This edition focuses on the transformative role of the social sciences in confronting climate and broader processes of environmental change, and in addressing priority problems from energy and water, biodiversity and land use, to urbanisation, migration and education.

The report includes 100 articles written by 150 authors from 41 countries all over the world. Authors represent some 24 disciplines, mainly in the social sciences.

The contributions highlight the central importance of social science knowledge for environmental change research, as a means of understanding changing environments in terms of social processes and as framework for finding concrete solutions towards sustainability.

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Relocation as a policy response to climate change vulnerability in northern China You do not have access to this content

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Author(s):
Y. Zheng, Jiahua Pan, Xiaoyu Zhang

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Taking the Ningxia Autonomous Region in China as an example, and applying participatory social research, this article assesses the important determinants of vulnerability to climate change in rural communities and the relative degree of spatial vulnerability. Over the past decades, rural households have undertaken self-initiated adaptation, while the local government is in the process of permanently relocating some inhabitants to less vulnerable regions.

 
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