Social protection

English
DOI: 
10.1787/3ddf51bf-en
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Social protection is a measure of the extent to which countries assume responsibility for supporting the standard of living of disadvantaged or vulnerable groups. Benefits may be targeted at low-income households, the elderly, disabled, sick, unemployed, or young persons. Social spending comprises cash benefits, direct in-kind provision of goods and services, and tax breaks with social purposes. To be considered "social", programmes have to involve either redistribution of resources across households or compulsory participation.

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Keywords:  expenditure, benefit, maternity leave, assistance, support, social, households, spending, transfer, income support, pensions
 

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  • Social spending

    Social expenditure comprises cash benefits, direct in-kind provision of goods and services, and tax breaks with social purposes. Benefits may be targeted at low-income households, the elderly, disabled, sick, unemployed, or young persons.
  • Pension spending

    Pension spending is defined as all cash expenditures, including lump-sum payments, on old-age pensions.
  • Public unemployment spending

    Public unemployment spending is defined as expenditure on cash benefits for people to compensate for unemployment.
  • Family benefits public spending

    Family benefits spending refer to public spending on family benefits which includes financial support that is exclusively for families and children.
  • Social benefits to households

    The National Accounts have two distinct categories of social benefits: social benefits other than social transfers in kind and social transfers in kind
  • Public spending on incapacity

    Public spending on incapacity refers to spending due to sickness, disability and occupational injury.
  • Public spending on labour markets

    Public spending on labour market programmes includes public employment services (PES), training, hiring subsidies and direct job creations in the public sector, as well as unemployment benefits.
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