Public Health - ethical issues
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Public Health - ethical issues

The Nordic Committee on Bioethics organised a conference in Reykjavik in August 2010 to discuss ethical issues relating to public health. The speakers of the conference have contributed to this book, which offers wide multidisciplinary perspectives on themes around Individual Freedom and Public Health, Health Responsibility and Life Style, and Social Equality and Justice.

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Ethnic discrimination and health in Sami settlement areas in Norway – The SAMINOR study You do not have access to this content

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Author(s):
Nordic Council of Ministers

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To our knowledge, this is the first Norwegian study into ethnic discrimination, bullying and health outcomes in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults using a large, population-based sample (Hansen 2011; Lund et al., 2007). Research into discrimination and health is growing rapidly and progressing (Williams and Mohammed, 2009). The findings in our study indicate that a large proportion of Sami individuals experience discrimination based on their background (Hansen et al., 2008), affirming findings from studies into the Sami youth population (Bals et al., 2010). Furthermore, our results demonstrate that ethnic discrimination is associated with inferior self-perceived health (Hansen et al., 2010) and psychological distress (Hansen and Sørlie, 2011), which is supported by several other studies across multiple population groups in a wide range of cultural and national contexts (Williams and Mohammed, 2009) including indigenous communities in the circumpolar north (Young and Bjerregaard, 2008). These findings suggest that perceived discrimination is an important emerging risk factor to negative health outcomes.