Naturalisation: A Passport for the Better Integration of Immigrants?
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Naturalisation: A Passport for the Better Integration of Immigrants?

This conference proceedings provides the papers presented at the OECD/European Commission joint seminar on Naturalisation and the Socio-Economic Integration of Immigrants and their Children held in October 2010 in Brussels. It takes stock of the current knowledge  regarding the links between host-country nationality and socio-economic integration of immigrants and their children, building on novel evidence on this issue.  It also discusses the role of naturalisation as a tool in the overall framework for immigration and integration policy, with the aim of identifying good practices.
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Publication Date :
31 Mar 2011
DOI :
10.1787/9789264099104-en
 
Chapter
 

The Labour Market Outcomes of Naturalised Citizens in Norway You do not have access to this content

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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/8111061ec010.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/social-issues-migration-health/naturalisation-a-passport-for-the-better-integration-of-immigrants/the-labour-market-outcomes-of-naturalised-citizens-in-norway_9789264099104-10-en
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Author(s):
OECD, Bernt Bratsberg, Oddbjørn Raaum
Pages :
183–205
DOI :
10.1787/9789264099104-10-en

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This chapter studies the labour market integration of immigrants in Norway from lower-income countries and assesses whether their integration process is influenced by acquisition of Norwegian citizenship. It finds that there is no positive effect of citizenship on the labour market status of immigrants. For some groups, there are even small, but statistically significant, negative effects on employment and earnings when estimated with individual fixed effects to account for unobserved heterogeneity. The chapter also discusses the discrepancy between these findings and prior evidence from the United States in light of possible causal mechanisms and differences in the labour market institutions of the two host countries.
Also available in: French