Jobs for Immigrants (Vol. 4)
Hide / Show Abstract

Jobs for Immigrants (Vol. 4)

Labour Market Integration in Italy

Until the mid-1990s, the share of migrants in Italy was relatively low in international comparison. With a persistent demand for foreign workers in low-skilled and low-paid jobs, the proximity of conflict areas and the enlargement of the European Union to Romania and Bulgaria in 2007, migration to Italy increased rapidly over the last 15 years. This report presents an overview of the skills and qualifications of immigrants in Italy, their key labour market outcomes in international comparison, and their evolution over time, given the highly segmented Italian labour market and its high share of informal jobs.

It analyses the framework for integration and the main integration policy instruments. Special attention is paid to funding issues and to the distribution of competences between national and sub-national actors. Finally, this report reviews the integration at school and the school-to-work transition of the children of immigrants

Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/8114121e.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/social-issues-migration-health/jobs-for-immigrants-vol-4_9789264214712-en
  • READ
 
Chapter
 

Immigrant integration policies in Italy You do not have access to this content

English
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/8114121ec008.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/social-issues-migration-health/jobs-for-immigrants-vol-4/immigrant-integration-policies-in-italy_9789264214712-8-en
  • READ
Author(s):
OECD

Hide / Show Abstract

This chapter reviews some important aspects of immigrant integration policies: first, immigrant participation to mainstream active labour market programmes as well as the existence of more targeted programmes are examined. Second, the evolution of language training supply, notably with the introduction of integration contract in 2012, is reviewed, as well as its co-ordination at the regional level. Third, the impact of successive regularisation programmes – through which a large share of migrants to Italy have passed at one time or another – is examined. The extent to which this impact is lowered by the recent economic crisis is considered. The fourth integration policy under review in this chapter is naturalisation criteria which is rather restrictive in Italy in international comparison despite recent amendment affecting native-born foreigners who have been residing continuously in Italy. Finally, the framework for anti-discrimination is evaluated.

Also available in Italian
 
Visit the OECD web site