International Migration Outlook 2014
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International Migration Outlook 2014

This flagship publication on migration analyses recent developments in migration movements and policies in OECD countries and selected non-OECD countries. This edition also contains two special chapters on "The labour market integration of immigrants and their children: developing, activating and using skills" and "Managing labour migration: Smart policies to support economic growth". It also includes Country notes and a Statistical Annex. This special edition is launched at the occasion of the High-level Policy Forum on Migration (Paris, 1-2 December 2014).

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Author(s):
OECD

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In 2012, the total inflow of foreign nationals to Austria increased to 125 600 persons, which represented a 13% increase compared to the previous year. The outflows increased as well, albeit at a more modest rate of 2.2% (or 74 400 persons). The net immigration of foreign nationals in 2012 reached 51 200 persons, slightly more than in 2011. The increased net inflow of migrants was likely a consequence of the free mobility within the EEA combined with the relatively favourable economic situation in Austria. GDP growth of 2.7% achieved in 2011 slowed down to 0.9% in 2012 in the wake of the economic recession in the euro area; however, the economic growth remained well above the euro area average (‑0.6%) mainly due to export growth and investments in public infrastructure and housing. Excluding Austrians, more than a half (63%) of the immigration flows to Austria came from the EU/EEA countries. Inflows from Southern Europe and the EU8 gained importance as did inflows from more distant origins, in particular Iran, the Russian Federation and Afghanistan.

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