Improving Value in Health Care
Hide / Show Abstract

Improving Value in Health Care

Measuring Quality

Are breast cancer survival rates higher in the United States than in the United Kingdom and France? Are a patient's chances of dying within 30 days after admission to a hospital with a heart attack lower in Canada than in Korea? Are surgeons in some countries more likely to leave "foreign bodies" behind after operations or make accidental punctures or lacerations rates when performing surgery? The need for answers to these kinds of questions and the value of measuring the quality of health care are among the issues addressed in this publication. 

Many health policies depend on our ability to measure the quality of care accurately. Governments want to increase "patient-centeredness", improve co-ordination of care, and pay providers of high-quality care more than those who underperform. However, measuring the quality of health care is challenging. The OECD’s Health Care Quality Indicator project has overcome some of the problems, though many remain. If policy makers are serious about improving the body of evidence on the quality of care, they need to improve their health information systems.  This publication describes what  international comparable quality measures  are currently available and how  to link these measures to quality policies such as accreditation, practice  guidelines, pay-for-performance, national safety programmes and quality reporting.

Click to Access: 
Publication Date :
07 Oct 2010
DOI :
10.1787/9789264094819-en
 
Chapter
 

Conclusions and Recommendations You do not have access to this content

Click to Access: 
Author(s):
OECD
Pages :
105–106
DOI :
10.1787/9789264094819-9-en

Hide / Show Abstract

Health care systems today face tremendous challenges: complex care needs and care processes, increased health care demands especially for chronic conditions and perhaps most importantly, an economic landscape where health care systems will have to achieve more for less. Quality has a fundamental bearing on all these challenges. Poor quality of care undermines every goal of modern health systems. It results in poor patient satisfaction, excess morbidity and premature mortality, and increased health costs.
Also available in: French