Health Reform
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Health Reform

Meeting the Challenge of Ageing and Multiple Morbidities

When the OECD was founded in 1961, health systems were gearing themselves up to deliver acute care interventions. Sick people were to be cured in hospitals, then sent on their way again. Medical training was focused on hospitals; innovation was to develop new interventions; payment systems were centred around single episodes of care.  Health systems have delivered big improvements in health since then, but they can be slow to adapt to new challenges. In particular, these days, the overwhelming burden of disease is chronic, for which ‘cure’ is out of our reach. Health policies have changed to some extent in response, though perhaps not enough.  But the challenge of the future is that the typical recipient of health care will be aged and will have multiple morbidities.  This book examines how  payment systems, innovation policies and human resource policies need to be modernised so that OECD health systems will continue to generate improved health outcomes in the future at a sustainable cost.
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Chapter
 

Ageing, health and innovation

Policy reforms to facilitate healthy and active ageing in OECD countries You do not have access to this content

English
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/social-issues-migration-health/health-reform/ageing-health-and-innovation_9789264122314-5-en
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Author(s):
Rebecca Taylor

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While all OECD countries are experiencing unprecedented demographic change, which has the potential to unravel health and social care systems, a negative outcome is not inevitable. This chapter presents some of the policies and measures that can be implemented to support and facilitate healthy and active ageing. These policies have the potential to mitigate the impact of demographic change on society as well as helping older people to continue to be active and productive citizens whether as workers, consumers, volunteers or care givers.
 
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