/content/chapter/reg_glance-2009-27-en
 
OECD Regions at a Glance 2009
branch Competing on the Basis of Regional Well-being
  branch
Safety: Reported crimes against property
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27.3. Rate of crime against property: Asia and Oceania Table in Excel
Rate of crime against property: Asia and Oceania
27.4. Rate of crime against the property: Europe Table in Excel
Rate of crime against the property: Europe
27.5. Rate of crime against the property: North America Table in Excel
Rate of crime against the property: North America

Safety is an important component of a region's attractiveness. Statistics on reported crime are usually affected by how crime is defined in the national legislation and by the statistical criteria used in recording offences. The lack of international standards for crime statistics makes international comparisons difficult. In addition, the public propensity to record offences varies greatly, not only among countries, but among regions in the same countries.

Figure 27.1 shows the variation of the rate of crime against property with respect to the country average. Spain, Mexico and the Czech Republic have the highest regional variation and New Zealand, Denmark and the Netherlands the lowest. The large variation in Spain is mainly due to two regions (Ceuta and Melilla) with a crime rate four times higher than the country average. In Mexico, the State of Baja California Norte, and in the Czech Republic, the region of Prague, both have a crime rate three times higher than their country average.

The correlation between the rate of crime against the property and the share of population living in urban regions is positive in all countries considered except the United States and Mexico (Figure 27.2). Most countries show a significant negative correlation between crime rates and share of population living in rural regions, except for the United States, Mexico and Canada.

Definition

The rate of crime against property is the number of reported crimes per 100 inhabitants. Reported crime against the property is the number of crimes reported to the police. Crimes against the property include: Forgery, arson, burglary, theft, robbery and malicious damage to property.

The Spearman correlation coefficient measures the strength and direction of the relationship between two variables, in this case the rate of crime against property and the share of population in predominantly urban (PU), intermediate (IN) or predominantly rural (PR) regions. A value close to zero means no relationship (see for formula).

 

Source

OECD Regional Database, http://dotstat/wbos/, theme: Regional Statistics.

See for data sources and country related metadata.

Reference years and territorial level

2005; TL2

Ireland, Spain and the United Kingdom, 2004; Italy, 2006.

No regional data available for Germany and Korea.

Figure notes

Figure 27.2: For each country three correlations are run between the regional crimes against property and the share of regional population living in PU, IN and PR regions.

Indicator in PDF Acrobat PDF page

Figures
27.1. Range in TL2 regional crimes against property per 100 inhabitants, 2005 Table in Excel
Range in TL2 regional crimes against property per 100 inhabitants, 2005
27.2. Spearman correlation between crime against property and population share by regional type, 2005 (TL2) Table in Excel
Spearman correlation between crime against property and population share by regional type, 2005 (TL2)