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Government at a Glance 2011
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branch Annex F. Detailed Data on Conflict-of-Interest Disclosure from the 2010 OECD Survey on Integrity

This annex provides data for each responding country on the types of private interests that they require central government decision makers to disclose as well as the level of transparency of these disclosures. The data underlie the summary of data presented in Figure 39.1  and Figure 39.2.

Table F.1.  Level of disclosure of private interests in the three branches of government by country (2010)

Table image

Notes

1. Information is disclosed and publicly available online or print.

2. Information is disclosed and not publicly available.

3. Information is disclosed and publicly available upon request.

4. Disclosure is not required.

5. P Prohibited.

6. Indicates not applicable (e.g. country has no President).

7. Indicates that data are missing.

8. Data reflect practices in member countries. Norway: Data regarding judges exclude lay judges and judges in conciliation boards.

9. Australia: Data regarding tax and customs officials refer to tax officials. Data regarding financial authorities refer to employees of the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA) and board members of the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC).

10. Paid outside positions: In Austria and Belgium for all positions and in Iceland and Switzerland for judges, any tenured civil servant is subject to the binding decision of the government in the case that an outside paid position may result in a conflict of interest. In Denmark, outside positions for judges can only be held (and must be disclosed) if these positions are reserved for judges by law or if permitted to by a special board. In Estonia, paid outside positions are prohibited by law for the Prime Minister, Ministers, judges and prosecutors, with the exceptions of research and teaching which should be disclosed.

11. Previous employment: In Estonia, no regulation requires members of the executive and legislature to publish information about previous employment; however in practice this information is proactively published.

12. Assets, liabilities, amounts and sources of income, and gifts: In Estonia, the disclosure of assets, liabilities and income of prosecutors are not publicly available, except for the Chief Public Prosecutor. In Iceland, the Prime Minister is only required to disclose loans that have been written off or changed to their benefit. In Ireland, Parliamentarians' salaries and allowances are publicly available. In addition, all parliamentarians including office holders must disclose their personal interests, i.e. income from other sources (i.e. outside paid positions), shares, directorships, land, gifts, below cost supply of a service or travel, consultancy work, and any interest in a public contract in annual statements of interests under the Ethics Acts. These interests are publicly available on the Registers of Members' Interests. In Japan, if the Minister is a member of the parliament, disclosure is required of income amount and gifts. In Mexico, gifts must be declared if they amount to equal or greater value of 10 times the minimum wage. Information on public servants is publicly published online if authorised by the public servants. In practice, about 66% of public servants make the information publicly available.

 

Table F.2.  Level of disclosure of private interests of selected officials in at-risk areas by country (2010)

Table image

Notes

1. Information is disclosed and publicly available online or print.

2. Information is disclosed and not publicly available.

3. Information is disclosed and publicly available upon request.

4. Disclosure is not required.

5. P Prohibited.

6. Indicates not applicable (e.g. country has no President).

7. Indicates that data are missing.

8. Norway: Data regarding judges exclude lay judges and judges in conciliation boards.

9. Australia: Data regarding tax and customs officials refer to tax officials. Data regarding financial authorities refer to employees of the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA) and board members of the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC).

10. Paid outside positions: In Austria and Belgium for all positions and in Iceland and Switzerland for judges, any tenured civil servant is subject to the binding decision of the government in the case that an outside paid position may result in a conflict of interest. In Denmark, outside positions for judges can only be held (and must be disclosed) if these positions are reserved for judges by law or if permitted to by a special board. In Estonia, paid outside positions are prohibited by law for the Prime Minister, Ministers, judges and prosecutors, with the exceptions of research and teaching which should be disclosed.

11. Previous employment: In Estonia, no regulation requires members of the executive and legislature to publish information about previous employment; however in practice this information is proactively published.

12. Assets, liabilities, amounts and sources of income, and gifts: In Estonia, the disclosure of assets, liabilities and income of prosecutors are not publicly available, except for the Chief Public Prosecutor. In Iceland, the Prime Minister is only required to disclose loans that have been written off or changed to their benefit. In Japan, if the Minister is a member of the parliament, disclosure is required of income amount and gifts. In Mexico, gifts must be declared if they amount to equal or greater value of 10 times the minimum wage. Information on public servants is publicly published online if authorised by the public servants. In practice, about 66% of public servants make the information publicly available.

 
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