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Development Co-operation Report 2016
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branch II. Profiles of development co-operation providers
branch Profiles of development co-operation providers
    branch Slovenia

Financial flows from Slovenia to developing countries

In 2015, Slovenia provided USD 62 million in net ODA (preliminary data), which represented 0.15% of gross national income (GNI) and a 21.1% increase in real terms from 2014, due in part to the overall scaling up of its aid, but also to higher in-donor refugee costs. Slovenia is the 22nd largest provider of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) in terms of official development assistance (ODA) as a percentage of GNI, and the 27th in terms of volume. It shall strive to increase its ODA/GNI to 0.33% by 2030 as agreed at the EU level. The grant element of total ODA was 100% in 2014. At present, data on other official flows, private grants (funds raised by non-governmental organisations and foundations) and private flows at market terms from Slovenia to developing countries are not available.

Slovenia reported USD 0.1 million of its in-donor refugee costs as ODA in 2014. These costs represented 0.1% of its total net ODA.

Development challenges as investment and business opportunities: Slovenia's policy and practices

The Slovenian government engages with a mix of domestic private sector partners through the Centre for International Co-operation and Development (CMSR) and the Slovenian Export and Development Bank (SID Bank). SID was created in 2009 and extends concessional loans. Slovenian companies implement the majority of infrastructure projects in the Western Balkans. The CMSR also promotes opportunities for public-private partnerships. Private sector co-operation also takes place in the framework of UNIDO. Slovenia allocated EUR 110 668 to private sector development in 2014 (membership in the International Center for Promotion of Enterprises).

Slovenia uses ODA to mobilise other resources for sustainable development

  • Slovenia contributes to the mobilisation of domestic resources in developing countries by supporting their tax systems. In 2014, it is estimated that Slovenia extended USD 0.12 million of its ODA to activities for capacity development for finance and tax officials in partner countries from South East Europe.
  • It promotes aid for trade to improve developing countries' trade performance and integration into the world economy. It committed USD 0.4 million to trade-related activities in 2014 (4.2% of its bilateral allocable ODA).

Slovenia's official development assistance

In 2014, 32.8% of ODA was provided bilaterally. In 2014, 67.1% of Slovenia's ODA was channelled to multilateral organisations, compared with the DAC country average of 28.3%. Slovenia principally allocated its multilateral contributions to the European Union (EU general budget and European Development Fund) to meet its mandatory contributions. The remainder of Slovenia's multilateral ODA consisted of contributions to the World Bank Group, as well as small contributions to the Global Environment Facility and the United Nations agencies. In addition, it channelled 5.7% of its bilateral ODA for specific projects implemented by multilateral organisations (multi-bi/non-core contributions).

In 2014, 32.7% of bilateral ODA was programmed at partner country level. Slovenia's share of country programmable aid (CPA) was lower than the DAC country average (52.9%). Project-type interventions made up 53% of CPA. Administrative and imputed student costs accounted for half of bilateral aid.

In 2014, USD 3.4 million of bilateral ODA was channelled to and through civil society organisations (CSOs). This was equivalent to 17.1% of bilateral ODA, in line with the DAC country average of 17.4%. Aid to and through CSOs decreased between 2013 and 2014, both in volume (-17%) and as a share of bilateral ODA (from 20.2% to 17.1%).

Bilateral ODA heavily focused on Eastern Europe (with a strong emphasis on South East Europe). In 2014, USD 12.1 million was allocated to Eastern Europe and USD 0.3 million to sub-Saharan Africa.

In 2014, 60.2% of bilateral ODA went to Slovenia's top 10 recipients. Slovenia has eight priority partner countries, all of which are among its top 10 recipients. In 2014, its support to fragile states reached USD 4.9 million (24.3% of gross bilateral ODA).

In 2014, 2.2% of bilateral ODA was allocated to least developed countries (LDCs), amounting to USD 0.4 million. This is a decrease from 6.1% in 2010 and 7.9% in 2011, and is far below the 2014 DAC average of 25.6%. Upper middle-income countries received the highest share of bilateral ODA in 2014 (45.9%), while 42% was unallocated by income group.

At 0.02% of GNI in 2014, total ODA to LDCs was far below the UN target of 0.15% of GNI.

In 2014, 61.5% of Slovenia's bilateral ODA was allocated to social infrastructure and services (USD 12.9 million), with a strong focus on education (USD 6.2 million), support to government and civil society (USD 4 million), and water and sanitation (USD 2.6 million). Until the end of 2015, Slovenia's bilateral co-operation focused on social services, economic services and infrastructure, and multi-sectoral priorities (including climate change adaptation and good governance).

USD 1.1 million of bilateral ODA supported gender equality in 2014. Women's empowerment is one of the cross-cutting themes of Slovenia's development co-operation. The Ministry for Foreign Affairs has developed a draft Gender Strategy. In 2014, 10.4% of Slovenian bilateral allocable aid had gender equality and women's empowerment as a principal or significant objective, compared with the DAC country average of 34.7%. Slovenia has a gender focus in the government and civil society sector.

USD 2.1 million supported the environment in 2014. Environmental protection, with a focus on sustainable water management, is one of the priority themes for Slovenia's development co-operation. In 2011, the Ministry for Foreign Affairs developed a Sustainable Water Management Strategy. In 2014, 20.1% of Slovenian bilateral allocable aid focused on the environment and 15.2% (or USD 1.6 million) focused specifically on climate change, compared with the respective DAC country averages of 32.2% and 23.9%.

Note to reader: Annex B provides “Methodological notes on definitions and measurement for the Profiles of Development Assistance Committee members” .

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Figures 
32.1. Net ODA: Trends in volume and as a share of GNI, 2005-15, Slovenia Figure in Excel
Net ODA: Trends in volume and as a share of GNI, 2005-15, Slovenia
32.2. Share of ODA channelled to the multilateral system, two year averages, gross disbursements, Slovenia Figure in Excel
Share of ODA channelled
to the multilateral system, two year averages, gross disbursements, Slovenia
32.3. Composition of bilateral ODA, 2014, gross disbursements, Slovenia Figure in Excel
Composition of bilateral ODA, 2014, gross disbursements, Slovenia
32.4. Bilateral ODA to and through CSOs, 2013-14 average, gross disbursements, Slovenia Figure in Excel
Bilateral ODA to and through CSOs, 2013-14 average, gross disbursements, Slovenia
32.5. Share of bilateral ODA by region, 2013-14 average, gross disbursements, Slovenia Figure in Excel
Share of bilateral ODA by region, 2013-14 average, gross disbursements, Slovenia
32.6. Bilateral ODA to top recipients, 2013-14 average, gross disbursements, Slovenia Figure in Excel
Bilateral ODA to top recipients, 2013-14 average, gross disbursements, Slovenia
32.7. Bilateral ODA by income group, two year averages, gross disbursements, Slovenia Figure in Excel
Bilateral ODA by income group, two year averages, gross disbursements, Slovenia
32.8. Share of bilateral ODA by sector, 2013-14 average, commitments, Slovenia Figure in Excel
Share of bilateral ODA by sector, 2013-14 average, commitments, Slovenia
32.9. Bilateral allocable ODA in support of global and local environment objectives, two year averages, commitments, Slovenia Figure in Excel
Bilateral allocable ODA in support of global and local environment objectives, two year averages, commitments, Slovenia
 



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