Trends in Telecommunication Reform 2002
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Trends in Telecommunication Reform 2002

Effective Regulation

The fourth edition of Trends in Telecommunication Reform is dedicated to the theme of effective and independent regulation. Since the beginning of the 1990s, the number of regulatory institutions has increased from 13 to more than 110, with many of them having been created in the past five years. But merely creating a regulatory body without empowering it to be effective is not enough. The report looks at the need for regulators; the process of creating a regulator; definitions of independence; why effectiveness may be more important than independence; powers and functions of the regulator; transparency in the decision-making process; organizational structure and finance issues. It is structured into nine chapters.

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English
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Author(s):
ITU

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Chapter 1 described the continuing evolution and development of the telecommunications industry into the information and communication technology (ICT) sector, emphasizing the increased emphasis on access to ICT networks and services. A wave of reforms is reshaping the industrial and governmental structures of the ICT sector worldwide, resulting in the emergence of a large number of new regulatory agencies for telecommunications and related industries. It is expected that even more will be created. By the end of 2001, there were more than 110 telecommunication regulatory agencies, compared with only 13 in 1990. The majority of these agencies were functioning separately from their oversight government ministries. Eighty per cent of these new agencies were in the developing world.