The State of Broadband 2014
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The State of Broadband 2014

Broadband for All

Every year, the ITU/UNESCO Broadband Commission for Digital Development publishes its 'State of Broadband' report to take the pulse of the global broadband industry and explore progress in broadband connectivity. This report provides a global snapshot of where the telecommunications/ICT industry stands with regards to fixed and mobile broadband deployment, affordability and usage, as well as the use of broadband for achieving development objectives, including the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It evaluates the take-up and development of broadband around the world, and tracks the Broadband Commission's targets. It draws on the thought leadership of the Commission and its research into National Broadband Plans. It also offers a range of perspectives on how to boost the roll-out and adoption of broadband networks and services across developing countries.

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Realizing our Future Built on Broadband You do not have access to this content

English
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ITU

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Ten years on from the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), the Information Society is today truly with us. By the end of 2014, some 2.9 billion people or 40% of the global population will be online (ITU, 20141). At current growth rates, half of the world’s population will be online by 2017. Technology commentators are often seduced by the promise of a hyper-connected world, focusing on embedded ambient intelligence, automated Machine to Machine (M2M) traffic, ubiquitous connectivity and the ‘Internet of Everything’. However, the real information revolution may lie in the growing day-byday use of Internet-enabled devices in all parts of our lives.