OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers

ISSN: 
1815-1965 (online)
DOI: 
10.1787/18151965
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The OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) leads OECD research on the contribution of science, technology and industry to well-being and economic growth. STI Working Papers cover a broad range of topics including definition and measurement of science and technology indicators, global value chains, and research on policies to promote innovation. These technical or analytical working papers are prepared by staff or outside consultants to share early insights and elicit feedback.
 

OECD Taxonomy of Economic Activities Based on R&D Intensity You or your institution have access to this content

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Author(s):
Fernando Galindo-Rueda1, Fabien Verger1
Author Affiliations
  • 1: OECD, France

16 July 2016
Bibliographic information
No:
2016/04
Pages:
24
DOI: 
10.1787/5jlv73sqqp8r-en

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This paper provides a new taxonomy of industries according to their level of R&D intensity - the ratio of R&D to value added within an industry. Manufacturing and non-manufacturing activities are clustered into five groups (high, medium-high, medium, medium-low, and low R&D intensity industries), drawing on new and expanded evidence from most OECD countries and some partner economies. This paper also reports on differences in R&D intensity within industries across countries. This document represents an update and reframing of previous OECD taxonomies based on earlier versions of the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), including services, whose coverage has improved in the R&D tables published by OECD (ANBERD). This taxonomy aims to support the presentation of statistics for industry groups when R&D is a relevant discriminant factor. Other existing or in-development taxonomies may be more appropriate for capturing differences in overall knowledge intensity or technology use.
 
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