OECD Science, Technology and Industry Scoreboard 2011
Hide / Show Abstract

OECD Science, Technology and Industry Scoreboard 2011

This tenth edition of the OECD Science, Technology and Industry (STI) Scoreboard builds on the OECD’s 50 years of indicator development to present major world trends in knowledge and innovation. It analyses a wide set of indicators of science, technology, globalisation and industrial performance in OECD and major non-OECD countries (notably Brazil, the Russian Federation, India, Indonesia, China and South Africa) and includes some experimental indicators that provide insight into new areas of policy interest.

For more information about the OECD STI Scoreboard, see www.oecd.org/sti/scoreboard.

Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/sti_scoreboard-2011-en/index.html
  • WEB
  • http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/9211041e.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/science-and-technology/oecd-science-technology-and-industry-scoreboard-2011_sti_scoreboard-2011-en
  • READ
Publication Date :
20 Sep 2011
DOI :
10.1787/sti_scoreboard-2011-en
 
Chapter
 

Services-manufacturing linkages You or your institution have access to this content

Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/sti_scoreboard-2011-en/06/02/index.html
  • WEB
  • http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/9211041ec056.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/science-and-technology/oecd-science-technology-and-industry-scoreboard-2011/services-manufacturing-linkages_sti_scoreboard-2011-56-en
  • READ
Author(s):
OECD
Pages :
168–169
DOI :
10.1787/sti_scoreboard-2011-56-en

Hide / Show Abstract

Manufacturing production in many OECD economies has declined in recent decades so that, on average, services now account for about 70% of OECD GDP. In fact, in the United States and the United Kingdom, employment in manufacturing industries is now less than 10% of total employment. As part of this general decline, the scope and nature of manufacturing has changed so that what was once dominated by skilled trades and vocations, machine operators, assembly line workers, etc., now relies increasingly on service occupations and service inputs. This reflects the increasing use of technology in production, international sourcing of more sophisticated intermediate inputs and a range of social factors (such as the changing skill composition of populations).