OECD Science, Technology and Industry Outlook 2014
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OECD Science, Technology and Industry Outlook 2014

The OECD Science, Technology and Industry Outlook 2014 reviews key trends in science, technology and innovation (STI) policies, and performance in more than 45 economies, including OECD countries and major emerging economies. The report draws on the latest OECD work on science and innovation policy analysis and measurement.

Following an overview of the STI global landscape and policy trends, key policy issues are discussed across a series of thematic policy profiles. The third section examines individual STI country performances, along with the most recent national policy developments. These global and national policy trends are monitored by a unique international policy survey conducted by the OECD every two years.

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Start-ups and innovative entrepreneurship You do not have access to this content

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OECD

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The process of business entry and exit as well as post-entry firm growth enhance productivity and drive economic growth. New enterprises exert competitive pressure on incumbents and improve resource allocation by forcing less efficient firms out of the market, a process which Schumpeter called creative destruction. This process is especially important during a post-recession phase, as business creation can help renew productivity growth and job creation (OECD, 2010; Criscuolo et al., 2014). New start-ups can exploit knowledge that is not used or is underused by existing companies and draw on existing knowledge to enter new or established markets (Acs et al., 2009). This is especially true in knowledge-intensive sectors.

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