Making Innovation Policy Work
Hide / Show Abstract

Making Innovation Policy Work

Learning from Experimentation

This book explores emerging topics in innovation policy for more inclusive and sustainable growth, building on concrete examples. It develops the notion of experimental innovation policy – which integrates monitoring and feedback at the policy design stage, and occurs continuously to improve impact and implementation. This approach should help improve the quality and efficiency of public expenditures supporting innovation policy.

Experimental policy making is particularly important for new and emerging innovation domains, where the scope for learning and improvement is the greatest. To make the discussion as concrete and relevant as possible for practitioners and policy makers, three emerging domains of innovation policy are explored in greater detail: innovative entrepreneurship, green innovation, and pro-poor or base-of-the-pyramid (BoP) innovation.

Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/9212081e.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/science-and-technology/making-innovation-policy-work_9789264185739-en
  • READ
 
Chapter
 

Incubating the incubation cycle: Two approaches to promoting techno-entrepreneurship in weak institutional environments You do not have access to this content

English
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/9212081ec008.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/science-and-technology/making-innovation-policy-work/incubating-the-incubation-cycle-two-approaches-to-promoting-techno-entrepreneurship-in-weak-institutional-environments_9789264185739-8-en
  • READ
Author(s):
Bob Hodgson, Yevgeny Kuznetsov

Hide / Show Abstract

While the field of innovation studies is extensive and rapidly expanding, analysis of innovation policy is much less developed. This chapter examines public interventions to support institutional infrastructure for technoentrepreneurship as an example of an endogenously developing policy process. Mainstream recommendations to support techno-entrepreneurship and innovation clusters focus on best-practice institutions. Consequently, the United States (Silicon Valley, Route 128, etc.), the United Kingdom, Finland, Singapore and Israel emerge as example to emulate. The chapter extends the discussion of these "usual suspects" by examining cases of improbable success: the emergence of Silicon Valley siblings (local ecosystems of innovation) in middle-income economies and localities with a deficient institutional environment. It juxtaposes two public policy approaches to supporting private innovation entrepreneurship: a traditional administrative approach and an emerging search networks approach.

 
Visit the OECD web site