OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers

ISSN: 
1815-1965 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/18151965
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The OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) leads OECD research on the contribution of science, technology and industry to well-being and economic growth. STI Working Papers cover a broad range of topics including definition and measurement of science and technology indicators, global value chains, and research on policies to promote innovation. These technical or analytical working papers are prepared by staff or outside consultants to share early insights and elicit feedback.
 

Inclusive innovation policies

Lessons from international case studies You or your institution have access to this content

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Author(s):
Sandra Planes-Satorra1, Caroline Paunov1
Author Affiliations
  • 1: OECD, France

25 Apr 2017
Bibliographic information
No:
2017/02
Pages:
57
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/a09a3a5d-en

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Innovation policies are central to growth agendas in most countries, but have figured much less prominently in strategies to promote social inclusion. In recent years, many countries have implemented “inclusive innovation policies”– a specific set of innovation policies that aim to boost the capacities and opportunities of disadvantaged individuals to engage in innovation activities, including research and entrepreneurship. Examples include the provision of grants to researchers from disadvantaged groups, the deployment of programmes to popularise science and technology, the provision of micro-credit to entrepreneurs and the provision of grants to firms locating their R&D activities in peripheral regions. This paper analyses the role that inclusive innovation policies can play in tackling social, industrial and territorial inclusiveness challenges by drawing on 33 detailed policy examples from 15 countries. The paper discusses why these policies should be a priority, explores the specific challenges that arise in their implementation and provides recommendations as to how the challenges can best be addressed.

 
 
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