Guidelines for Industry on Child Online Protection
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Guidelines for Industry on Child Online Protection

This publication provides a common framework for all parts of the industry towork towards the shared goal of making the Internet as safe as possible for children and young people. Internet Service Providers have a distinct responsibility with regards to Child Online Protection. This is largely due to the fact that ISPs act as both a conduit, providing access to and from the Internet, and a repository because of the hosting, caching and storage services which they provide. The same is true for the mobile phone networks, many of whom now extend their functionality well beyond the original business of connecting voice and data exchanges. Broadcasters similarly have become major players in the Internet space, providing many of the online services which previously were only associated with ISPs or online hosting companies.

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Chapter
 

Content Control Mechanisms You do not have access to this content

English
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Author(s):
ITU

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Providers of online content and services are developing a range of approaches for enabling the ageappropriate control of content in the online world. These include mechanisms to restrict access to content until the user has proven his or her age (“age-verification”) as well as controls made available to parents to enable them to place restrictions on their child’s consumption of online content and services.