OECD Digital Economy Papers

ISSN :
2071-6826 (online)
DOI :
10.1787/20716826
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The OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) undertakes a wide range of activities to better understand how information and communication technologies (ICTs) contribute to sustainable economic growth and social well-being. The OECD Digital Economy Papers series covers a broad range of ICT-related issues and makes selected studies available to a wider readership. They include policy reports, which are officially declassified by an OECD Committee, and occasional working papers, which are meant to share early knowledge.
 

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Author(s):
OECD
Publication Date
17 Jan 2013
Bibliographic information
No.:
215
Pages
30
DOI
10.1787/5k4dkhvnzv35-en

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This report examines the development of smart networks and services with particular attention to the implications for communication policy and regulation. The word "smart" has become a term that is frequently affixed to an area where the introduction of networked information and communication technologies (ICTs) is expected to have significant implications for economic and social development. In this document it is defined as: an application or service that is able to learn from previous situations and to communicate the results of these situations to other devices and users. Collection of data will be enabled by the expansion of Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications. Large scale processing will be delivered by "cloud computing" services. Analysis of these data will be undertaken around a process frequently called "big data". These phenomenona together form the "building blocks of smart networks". Each distinguishes itself from previous similar developments because the size of numbers of devices, data and elements is orders of magnitude larger than that of previous periods.