HIV/AIDS and the Security Sector in Africa
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HIV/AIDS and the Security Sector in Africa

Throughout history, communicable diseases have weakened the capacity of state institutions to perform core security functions, which compelled many African countries to initiate policies aimed at addressing the impact of HIV/AIDS on the armed forces, police and prisons. These policies address: 1) the role of peacekeepers in the spread or control of HIV, 2) public health versus human rights dilemma, 3) the gender dimensions of HIV in the armed forces, and 4) the impact of HIV on the police and prisons. While this volume does not address all aspects of the impact of HIV/AIDS on the security sector, the contributors nonetheless highlight the potentials and limits of existing policies in Africa’s security sector.
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UNU

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This book – originally conceived as the “HIV/AIDS in the Military ( MilAIDS)” research project under the Defence Sector Programme of the Institute for Security Studies (ISS) – was generously funded by The Rockefeller Brothers Fund. Following a conference on the theme “Trends, Impacts and Policy Development on HIV/AIDS and African Armed Forces” held in Johannesburg, South Africa, 2–5 December 2007, and the subsequent publication of the conference proceedings by the ISS, the United Nations University (UNU) and the ISS decided to further collaborate to broaden the theme of the project, invite more contributors and publish a policy-oriented peer-reviewed volume. This book is the product of this collaborative initiative. We would like to thank The Rockefeller Brothers Fund for its initial funding and all the research interns, programme associates and administrative assistants at both UNU and ISS who, at various times, worked with us to produce this volume. In particular, we would like to thank Johanna Stratton, Andrea Ottina, Greg Lowden (UNU) and Nadia Ahmadou (ISS) for their excellent research and administrative assistance. We are grateful to the United Nations University Press for their editorial support.