Statistical Papers - United Nations (Ser. A), Population and Vital Statistics Report

English
ISSN: 
2412-138X (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/e59eddca-en
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The Population and Vital Statistics Report series presents data for countries or areas on population size (total, male, and female) from the latest available census, estimated total population size for the later available year, and the number and rate of vital events (live births, deaths, and infant deaths) for the latest available year within the past 15 years. These data are presented as reported by national statistical authorities to the Demographic Yearbook of the Statistics Division of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs.
 
World Mortality Report 2015

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English
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Author(s):
UN
10 Oct 2017
Pages:
114
ISBN:
9789210576765 (PDF)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/8344d573-en

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World Mortality Report 2015 is a publication that provides an overview of the estimated and projected trends in mortality at the world level, for development groups and major areas; the analysis also focuses on country and regional data for selected mortality indicators. In addition to examining the summary indicator of life expectancy at birth, the report analyzes levels and trends in mortality for key age groups in childhood and provides a snapshot of adult and “old age” mortality levels. It also examines the socio-economic determinants of child hood mortality at the aggregate level across countries, and on disparities within countries in 50 low and middle income countries (LMIC) based on Demographic and Health Surveys data.

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  • Preface

    The World Mortality Report 2015, prepared by the Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat, provides an overview of the patterns, levels, and trends in mortality at the national, regional, and global level during 1950-2015 drawn from the latest set of demographic estimates for 233 countries or areas, as published in World Population Prospects: The 2015 Revision (United Nations, 2015a). The analysis focuses on country and regional data for selected mortality indicators. In addition to examining the summary indicator of life expectancy at birth, the report analyses levels and trends in mortality for key age groups in childhood and provides a snapshot of adult and “old age” mortality levels. The report focuses mostly on the period from 1990 to 2015, the implementation period identified for the Millennium Development Goals, and reviews in particular how further improvements in child survival can be achieved by addressing key determinants of inequalities in infant and early childhood mortality in selected lower and middle-income countries. Some implications for the sustainable development goals and targets on health are discussed, including priorities for future reductions in mortality risks.

  • Explanatory notes
  • Executive summary

    The global increase of living standard, the improvement in health and the consequent reduction in mortality over the last six and a half decades are among the notable achievements of development. Central to this transformation has been the epidemiological transition, from predominantly infectious causes of death to a predominance of deaths due chronic and degenerative diseases. The epidemiological transition entailed a shift in the age pattern of mortality from one in which childhood diseases were more common to a situation where disease and mortality are highly concentrated at older ages, thus the importance of analysing mortality in childhood, adulthood and at old age. The driving force in this transition is socioeconomic development accompanied by investments in public health and education.

  • Global levels and trends in mortality

    The global increase of living standard, the improvement in health, and the consequent reduction in mortality over the last six and half decades are among the notable achievements of development. This report analyses worldwide mortality declines, according to the 2015 Revision of World Population Prospects. Life expectancy at birth for the world as a whole rose from 46.8 years in 1950-1955 to 70.5 years in 2010-2015. The proportion of the world’s population living in countries where life expectancy was below 50 years fell from 57.7 per cent in the early 1950s to 0.1 per cent in 2010-2015, while the share living in countries with life expectancy of 70 years or higher rose from 1 per cent to 55.1 per cent. Over the same period, the probability of dying in early childhood — that is, the number of deaths below age 5 per 1,000 live births — fell from 215.1 per 1,000 to 49.6 per 1,000.

  • Socio economic determinants of inequalities in infant and early childhood mortality

    Considerable progress has been achieved on child survival during the last decades. A child born in Africa or Southern Asia in 2015 was about 25 percent more likely to celebrate his or her fifth birthday than a child born in those two regions in 1960. His or her chances of survival were even larger if he was born in Latin America, Asia or Europe. For example, a child born in Brazil or Myanmar in 2015 could expect to live 20 years longer than one born in those countries just 50 years ago (WHO, 2015a).

  • Policy implications of the Sustainable Development Goals for population health

    Considerable progress has been achieved on child survival during the last decades. A child born in Africa or Southern Asia in 2015 was about 25 percent more likely to celebrate his or her fifth birthday than a child born in those two regions in 1960. His or her chances of survival were even larger if he was born in Latin America, Asia or Europe. For example, a child born in Brazil or Myanmar in 2015 could expect to live 20 years longer than one born in those countries just 50 years ago (WHO, 2015a).

  • References
  • Summary mortality indicators in 1950-2015, by country or area
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