Asia-Pacific Population Journal

Frequency
3 times a year
ISSN: 
1564-4278 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/2702b8d0-en
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For over two decades, the Asia-Pacific Population Journal (APPJ) has been taking the pulse of population and social issues unfolding in the region. Published by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), APPJ brings out high quality, evidence-based and forward-looking articles relevant for population policies and programmes in Asia and the Pacific. Prominent population experts, award-winning demographers, as well as lesser known researchers have been contributing articles, documenting over the years the evolution of thinking in this important sphere.
Article
 

Marriage and fertility dynamics in India You do not have access to this content

English
 
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/dcf9f3c9-en.pdf
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Author(s):
Premchand Dommaraju
23 Oct 2013
Pages:
18
Bibliographic information
No.:
2,
Volume:
26,
Issue:
2
Pages:
21–38
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/dcf9f3c9-en

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It is widely acknowledged that age at marriage has a significant influence on fertility, particularly in the countries where childbearing occurs within marriage. However, the complexities of marriage/fertility relationship are poorly understood, especially during fertility transitions. This paper investigates the complex relationship between marriage and fertility by examining age at marriage, marital fertility and birth interval dynamics in India, using data collected in nationally representative surveys in 1992/1993 and 2005/2006. The decline in fertility during this period could be attributed to changes in marital fertility rather than to changes in marriage age. Women marrying late tend to have shorter first birth interval than women marrying at a younger age. However, the second and higher birth intervals are longer among those marrying late.