Asia-Pacific Population Journal

Frequency
3 times a year
ISSN: 
1564-4278 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/2702b8d0-en
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For over two decades, the Asia-Pacific Population Journal (APPJ) has been taking the pulse of population and social issues unfolding in the region. Published by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), APPJ brings out high quality, evidence-based and forward-looking articles relevant for population policies and programmes in Asia and the Pacific. Prominent population experts, award-winning demographers, as well as lesser known researchers have been contributing articles, documenting over the years the evolution of thinking in this important sphere.
Article
 

Empowerment of women and its impact on population You do not have access to this content

English
 
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/65b7f1c3-en.pdf
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Author(s):
Leela Visaria
31 Dec 2012
Pages:
27
Bibliographic information
No.:
2,
Volume:
27,
Issue:
1
Pages:
33–59
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/65b7f1c3-en

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The data presented in this article from selected Asian and Pacific countries show that in the last two decades women have gained significantly in economic and social spheres, such as literacy, enrolment rates, gender inequality in education, age at marriage and participation in formal economic activities. Along with improvements in these empowerment measures, the region has also experienced substantial reductions in fertility, infant and child mortality, and maternal mortality and reported increases in use of contraception. However, not all countries in the Asian and Pacific region have made enough or equal progress in empowering women. Compared with women in many countries in East and South-East Asia, a significant proportion of young South Asian women remain deprived of education beyond the primary level and marry early, with adverse implications for their own health and that of their children.