Asia-Pacific Population Journal

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3 times a year
ISSN: 
1564-4278 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/2702b8d0-en
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For over two decades, the Asia-Pacific Population Journal (APPJ) has been taking the pulse of population and social issues unfolding in the region. Published by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), APPJ brings out high quality, evidence-based and forward-looking articles relevant for population policies and programmes in Asia and the Pacific. Prominent population experts, award-winning demographers, as well as lesser known researchers have been contributing articles, documenting over the years the evolution of thinking in this important sphere.
 

Volume 30, Issue 2 You do not have access to this content

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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/8842a567-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/population-and-demography/asia-pacific-population-journal/volume-30/issue-2_8842a567-en
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08 Sep 2016
ISBN:
9789210576727 (PDF)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/8842a567-en

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  08 Sep 2016
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/8ec0129d-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/population-and-demography/the-contribution-of-age-specific-mortality-towards-male-and-female-life-expectancy-differentials-in-india-and-selected-states-1970-2013_8ec0129d-en
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The contribution of age-specific mortality towards male and female life expectancy differentials in India and selected States, 1970-2013
Vladimir Canudas-Romo, Nandita Saikia, Nadia Diamond-Smith
Most research on mortality differentials by sex in India focuses on disparities among children under 5 years of age. In this paper, we assess the changing age and cause patterns of mortality by sex in India and selected States using survey data and including mortality trends over the life span. Since the 1970s, the gap between female and male mortality in India has increased to females’ advantage. This occurred despite persisting higher female mortality below age 5, a disadvantage masked by the large gap favoring women at adult and older ages. This paper finds that the life expectancy gap between females and males in the second half of the 1990s can be attributed mainly to non-communicable diseases and external causes of death. While more developed States (primarily in the South) showed higher female longevity already in the 1970s, the States that lagged behind displayed similar mortality levels for females and males up until the turn of the century.
  08 Sep 2016
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/cdf66074-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/population-and-demography/demography-of-a-small-island-nation-findings-from-the-2011-census-of-population-and-housing-of-the-republic-of-the-marshall-island_cdf66074-en
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Demography of a Small Island Nation: Findings from the 2011 Census of Population and Housing of the Republic of the Marshall Island
Bhakta B. Gubhaju, Arthur Jorari, Gerald Haberkorn
The 2011 Census of Population and Housing of the Republic of the Marshall Islands is the eleventh such census conducted since 1920. The main objective of the present paper is to highlight trends in population growth, fertility, mortality and migration, using the 2011 census. The 2011 census, conducted on 5 April 2011, recorded a total population of 53,158; it collected comprehensive information on the fertility history of women 15 to 54 years of age, which included questions on children ever born and children still living by sex. The fertility history also included the date of birth of the last child born alive. These data have been used to estimate current fertility and to indirectly estimate life expectancy at birth and infant mortality by sex. The current paper provides recommendations on: relevant government policies to improve existing or emerging socioeconomic conditions revealed by the census results; and areas of census planning, field management and data utilization in the Marshall Islands and in the rest of the Pacific countries.
  08 Sep 2016
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/35479cd3-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/population-and-demography/scenarios-of-population-change-in-the-coastal-ganges-brahmaputra-delta-2011-2051_35479cd3-en
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Scenarios of population change in the coastal Ganges Brahmaputra Delta (2011-2051)
Sylvia Szabo, Dilruba Begum, Sate Ahmad, Zoe Matthews, Peter Kim Streatfield
This paper provides an overview of population dynamics and scenarios of population change in the environmentally vulnerable coastal Ganges Brahmaputra Delta region. The main data sources used for the study include the most recent and historical census data, data from the Sample Vital Registration System (SVRS) and Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS). The research adopts the standard cohort component approach for population projections and provides population estimates for the period from 2011 to 2051. Research outcomes include scenarios of future population change in the coastal Ganges Brahmaputra Delta region and district-level population projections by age and sex. The results show that population growth is likely to continue in some, but not all, districts in the study area. The results also suggest that future migration flows are most likely to be the deciding component of population change in the study area. Given the expected shifts in population distribution and population structure, policy initiatives will have to address the challenges related to informal settlements and population ageing.
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