Asia-Pacific Population Journal

Frequency
3 times a year
ISSN: 
1564-4278 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/2702b8d0-en
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For over two decades, the Asia-Pacific Population Journal (APPJ) has been taking the pulse of population and social issues unfolding in the region. Published by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), APPJ brings out high quality, evidence-based and forward-looking articles relevant for population policies and programmes in Asia and the Pacific. Prominent population experts, award-winning demographers, as well as lesser known researchers have been contributing articles, documenting over the years the evolution of thinking in this important sphere.
 

Volume 26, Issue 4 You do not have access to this content

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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/1f3b0ffa-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/population-and-demography/asia-pacific-population-journal/volume-26/issue-4_1f3b0ffa-en
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23 Oct 2013
ISBN:
9789210557092 (PDF)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/1f3b0ffa-en

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  23 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/d6a8c96b-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/population-and-demography/demographic-transition-in-southern-asia-challenges-and-opportunities_d6a8c96b-en
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Demographic transition in Southern Asia: Challenges and opportunities
Bhakta B. Gubhaju
This paper examines fertility and mortality trends in Southern Asia and their consequences for changes in age structure, dependency ratio, population ageing and feminization of the elderly population. It highlights challenges and opportunities brought about by the demographic transition. In particular the paper suggests ways in which countries in Southern Asia can reap the benefits of the “demographic dividend”, which is a one-time “window of opportunity” that countries in the region should fully exploit. This is particularly evident when looking towards future demographic trends in the region in which a number of countries in Southern Asia will need to deal with problems associated with ageing. In preparing for such a future, there is a need to start formulating policies for the elderly today.
  23 Oct 2013
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/population-and-demography/do-slum-dwellers-have-lower-contraceptive-prevalence-rates-an-analysis-of-current-use-patterns-in-calcutta-india_426b44ce-en
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Do slum dwellers have lower contraceptive prevalence rates? An analysis of current use patterns in Calcutta, India
Mousumi Dutta, Zakir Husain
This paper examines whether there are significant variations in contraceptive prevalence rates between women who live or do not live in slums of Calcutta, India. A Disparity Index is calculated, using unit level data from the 2006 Demographic Health Survey. The Index reveals that variations in overall and modern contraceptive prevalence rates between currently married slum and non-slum respondents are low. Statistical tests (both parametric and non-parametric) reveal that though differences in overall contraceptive prevalence rates are significantly lower in slums, differences in usage of modern methods between slum and non- slum areas is marginal. This is also confirmed by econometric methods using an ordered logit model. This model indicates that slum respondents are reluctant to adopt contraceptives. However, once their initial resistance is overcome, they prefer modern – particularly terminal – methods. Analysis reveals that cultural forces – socio-religious identity, language and preference for more children (particularly sons) – are responsible for creating barriers to adopting family planning methods.
  23 Oct 2013
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/population-and-demography/mobility-as-development-strategy-the-case-of-the-pacific-islands_6d72b34b-en
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Mobility as development strategy: The case of the Pacific Islands
Donovan Storey, Vanessa Steinmayer
Migration is often portrayed in terms of net gain or loss in which remittances provide the compensation for those States or territories which are seen as disadvantaged in the competition for especially skilled workers. In the Pacific region this dichotomy is illustrated through the loss for countries of origin (Pacific island countries and territories) of their “best and brightest” to the region’s larger and more prosperous States. This has occurred to such an extent that many see the limited development gains made by small island States and territories in the post World War Two period as being largely explained by the failure to counter the resulting inequalities in both “brain drain” and “brain gain”. This article argues that such a dichotomy misses those shared development gains reaped through increased labour mobility. Indeed, migration can underpin a “development dividend” for the region through the enhancement of increased mobility, including for low-skilled workers. Recent schemes have sought to balance both migration opportunities and development needs. While these are promising, much more could be done to support the conditions in which Pacific Islanders of all socio-economic status can circulate.
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