Asia-Pacific Population Journal

Frequency
3 times a year
ISSN: 
1564-4278 (online)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/2702b8d0-en
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For over two decades, the Asia-Pacific Population Journal (APPJ) has been taking the pulse of population and social issues unfolding in the region. Published by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), APPJ brings out high quality, evidence-based and forward-looking articles relevant for population policies and programmes in Asia and the Pacific. Prominent population experts, award-winning demographers, as well as lesser known researchers have been contributing articles, documenting over the years the evolution of thinking in this important sphere.
 

Volume 26, Issue 3 You do not have access to this content

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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/5c9c64b3-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/population-and-demography/asia-pacific-population-journal/volume-26/issue-3_5c9c64b3-en
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23 Oct 2013
ISBN:
9789210557085 (PDF)
http://dx.doi.org/10.18356/5c9c64b3-en

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  23 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/07f2a46c-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/population-and-demography/contraceptive-in-security-in-south-east-asia_07f2a46c-en
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Contraceptive (In)security in South-East Asia
Rosalia Sciortino
In South-East Asia sexual and reproductive health needs remain substantial and are not adequately met by the current supply of contraceptive products and services. While financial and technical scarcity persists, it is the facilitation of the policy environment and the fulfilment of equity principles in the delivery of contraceptive methods that present the greatest challenges in achieving contraceptive security. A regional advocacy agenda should address the ideological objections to modern contraceptives and to people’s contraceptive choices and ensure that contraceptive security is meant for all and not only for privileged groups and countries.
  23 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/e5944c36-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/population-and-demography/social-impact-of-international-migration-and-remittances-in-central-asia_e5944c36-en
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Social impact of international migration and remittances in Central Asia
Dono Abdurazakova
The dissolution of the former Soviet Union and the transition from a centrally planned to a market-based economy within the subregion of Central Asia has been accompanied by population movements which were unprecedented in modern history. While lack of reliable statistical data makes it difficult to assess the scope and scale of such movements in Central Asia, migration is predicted to rise substantially due to declining working-age populations in some countries, and high rates of population growth accompanied by relative economic disadvantage in others. This article attempts to explore key social issues emerging in relation to labor migration and remittances, and examines the impact of migration on communities in both countries of origin and countries of destination. It concludes with key policy recommendations, which include: instigating constructive regional dialogue on migration; focusing on gender-sensitive issues; undertaking policy measures to effectively address the needs of migrants; and creating better social protection and services for migrants and their families.
  23 Oct 2013
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    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/ae006456-en.pdf
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  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/population-and-demography/economic-activity-in-post-retirement-life-in-india_ae006456-en
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Economic activity in post retirement life in India
Preeti Dhillon, Laishram Ladusingh
The article analyses trends in work participation and working life expectancy in post retirement life of persons aged 60 plus by primary, secondary and tertiary sectors to examine a correlation between longevity and post retirement economic activity in India. It was found that in India the average length of working life at 60 plus is 9.8 years for males and 3.9 years for females. Though the life expectancy at 60 plus for males had increased by 2.9 years over the period 1971-2001, working life expectancy for males had decreased marginally by 0.1 years during the same reference period. On the other hand, with a 4.2 year gain in longevity at age 60 plus among females during 1971-2001, their working life expectancy increased by 2.4 years during the same reference period. Work participation has shifted from the primary to the formal sector, which indicates an increase in productive activity in the post retirement period.
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