Year in Review: United Nations Peace Operations, 2012
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Year in Review: United Nations Peace Operations, 2012

No day is quite the same in the life of a peacekeeper and working in the field has its demands and rewards. Peace operations continue to evolve with more robust and multidimensional mandates requiring expertise in human rights, justice, rule of law, security and political diplomacy, to name a few. The Year in Review features the activities of the UN Peacekeeping Missions in 2012, highlighting the successes and challenges that emerge throughout the year. It looks at how these challenges-- many times unforeseen, always under difficult conditions --are met by the peacekeepers on the ground as they work towards maintaining peace and security, protecting civilians, and providing support to fragile societies and governments in a post-conflict setting.
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UNPOS (Somalia): Historic year for Somalia’s political progress You do not have access to this content

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It was an historic moment. On 10 September 2012, a new Somali Federal Parliament sitting in Mogadishu elected a President — the first such democratic exercise in over 20 years. The transitional period had ended peacefully following an inclusive, transparent, legitimate, participatory and Somali-led process. Considered by many to be a hopeless, failed state just months ago, Somalia now has its best chance for peace in a generation. In Mogadishu, long tarred with the moniker of “most dangerous city on Earth,” the sound of gunfire and explosions has been replaced with the noise of construction and the hum of commerce. Flights into the city are booked months in advance. New restaurants and hotels open every day and the city’s real estate boom produces frequent concrete shortages. Hope and progress have returned to Somalia.