Towards Transparent, Proportionate and Deliverable Regulation for Geological Disposal
Hide / Show Abstract

Towards Transparent, Proportionate and Deliverable Regulation for Geological Disposal

These workshop proceedings highlight the significant amount of work accomplished over the past decade in delivering transparent, proportionate regulation for geological disposal, and identify important differences between national regulations even if these are not in contradiction with international guidance. They also underline the importance of R&D carried out on behalf of the regulator. In addition to the contributed papers, these proceedings trace the numerous discussions that formed an integral part of the workshop. They constitute an important and unique documentary basis for researchers and radioactive waste management specialists. Themes addressed include duties to future generations, timescales for regulation, stepwise decision making, roles of optimisation and best available techniques (BAT), multiple lines of reasoning, safety and performance indicators, recognition of uncertainties and the importance of stakeholder interactions.
Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/6610011e.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/nuclear-energy/towards-transparent-proportionate-and-deliverable-regulation-for-geological-disposal_9789264083554-en
  • READ
Publication Date :
09 Feb 2010
DOI :
10.1787/9789264083554-en
 
Chapter
 

Main Findings: Lessons to be Learnt You do not have access to this content

Click to Access: 
    http://oecd.metastore.ingenta.com/content/6610011ec003.pdf
  • PDF
  • http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/nuclear-energy/towards-transparent-proportionate-and-deliverable-regulation-for-geological-disposal/main-findings-lessons-to-be-learnt_9789264083554-3-en
  • READ
Author(s):
OECD, NEA
Pages :
14–51
DOI :
10.1787/9789264083554-3-en

Hide / Show Abstract

Starting already in the first plenary session, and continuing through the table discussions and the closing plenary session, there was a high level of participation from all present. The participants had the opportunity to meet persons from other countries and other backgrounds and to carry on stimulating discussions on topics of interest. The method of having reference questions prepared in advance and dividing those questions up among the tables ensured that a variety of issues were addressed and that the collective knowledge of all participants was leveraged. There were few definitive conclusions reached at the workshop, but many comments were made and issues were raised that complete our understanding of the status of regulations on long-term safety in NEA countries and that provide the basis for judging which issues deserve the highest priority and which ones are closer to solution at the international level. This is consistent with the expectations for this series of workshops.